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Example: Thread::Thread:

class Thread
{
    Process * parent_;
    unsigned __int32 id_;
    void * entryPoint_;
public:
    Thread(Process * parent, unsigned __int32 id, void * entryPoint) : 
        parent_(parent),
        id_(id),
        entryPoint_(entryPoint)
    {
    }
    unsigned __int32 GetId() const
    {
        return id_;
    }
    void * GetEntryPointAddress() const
    {
        return entryPoint_;
    }
};

I can't seem to come up with a way of indenting things so that it doesn't look strange... and yet this is a common pattern. What are common ways of indenting this?

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As I've answered questions like this before: As long as your'e consistent, it really doesn't matter. :) (That said, I'm curious why you think it looks strange. It looks perfectly fine to me. :) –  greyfade Jan 9 '11 at 21:28
    
put it all in one line and don't think about it! :D –  ybungalobill Jan 9 '11 at 21:40
1  
@greyfade: Part of being consistent is doing what others do. I've never seen anyone express an opinion on this, so I asked. Don't know exactly why -- just makes me cringe for some reason. @ybungalobill: That makes merging things in source control difficult. –  Billy ONeal Jan 9 '11 at 22:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I always put empty blocks on a single line – i.e. { } (notice the space!).

Furthermore, I usually put the colon and commas in front of the initialization list members instead of after – this makes adding members later on easier.

Thread(Process * parent, unsigned __int32 id, void * entryPoint)
    : parent_(parent)
    , id_(id)
    , entryPoint_(entryPoint)
{ }
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BTW (even though i don't use this style) this style may be good because it's the only one MS Visual Studio will not mess up with its automatic formatting. –  anatolyg Jan 9 '11 at 21:44
2  
Sometimes when it looks like there should be code I add a comment /* Deliberately Empty */ (but only if it needs to be explained). –  Crappy Experience Bye Jan 9 '11 at 22:12
    
@Martin: Would you add one here? –  Billy ONeal Jan 9 '11 at 22:36
    
@Billy ONeal: It depends a lot on context (and we don;t have much here). But I may add a comment. /* This is not the thread start point. This initializes the thread object. The Thread of execution will later be started by calling the method XXXX() */ –  Crappy Experience Bye Jan 9 '11 at 22:43
1  
@pydave It isn’t important but the question was about formatting preferences, and I prefer to space empty braces with a space to make them stand out more – especially when they are a placeholder for a whole block. Just {} is slightly too innocuous for my taste, and leaving a line break between them takes up too much vertical space. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 11 '13 at 22:47

This is how I do it:

Thread(Process * parent, unsigned __int32 id, void * entryPoint) 
    :parent_(parent),
     id_(id),
     entryPoint_(entryPoint)
{}

But your way does not look strange to me.

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Here's how I do it

public:
    Thread(Process * parent, unsigned __int32 id, void * entryPoint) : 
    parent_(parent),
    id_(id),
    entryPoint_(entryPoint) 
    { }

Google style (atleast protobuf), would be:

public:
 Thread(Process * parent, 
        unsigned __int32 id, 
        void * entryPoint) 
  : parent_(parent),
    id_(id),
    entryPoint_(entryPoint) { }
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Here's how I do it, and why I don't see anything wrong with your sample:

Thread(Process * parent, unsigned __int32 id, void * entryPoint) : 
        parent_(parent),
        id_(id),
        entryPoint_(entryPoint) { }

As far as I'm concerned, do it your way: As long as you are self-consistent and consistent with the project you're working on, it doesn't matter what your indentation style is.

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you can check Google C++ Style Guide

also once I saw something like this from David Abrahams as recommended coding style for Boost libraries, but cannot find now

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4  
There's nothing about this in that guide. (Not a fan of that guide in any case) –  Billy ONeal Jan 9 '11 at 21:58

I'd recommend putting a comment into the empty constructor body, just so anyone reading the code knows that you intended it to be empty. That way they can be certain that it's not a case of you having forgotten to insert code there.

Thread(Process * parent, unsigned __int32 id, void * entryPoint) : 
    parent_(parent),
    id_(id),
    entryPoint_(entryPoint)
{
    // empty
}
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you know what, I actually don't like this because it will frighten somebody to put code here later. But if its necessary the maintainer should not be coereced/biaised into thinking not to do that by a scary comment. –  v.oddou Jun 2 '14 at 1:59
    
"empty" is a scary comment, really? I guess one could be more explicit e.g. "// I intentionally didn't put any code here, but you go ahead if you think it's the right thing to do" but I think that might be a bit overkill. Either comment will be less scary to a maintainer than forcing him to try to guess what the original author's intent was, due to the absence of any clues about why the method body is empty. –  Jeremy Friesner Jun 2 '14 at 4:13

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