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Why does the program listed below run on mac osx and linux but not on freebsd?

The freebsd core dumps after the exception is thrown with the following message:

terminate called after throwing an instance of 'ObjectException'
  what():  error not allowed
[1]    28946 abort (core dumped)  ./bin/main

On all three platforms I use gnu compilers

freebsd g++ --version : g++ (GCC) 4.2.1 20070719

mac os x g++ --version: i686-apple-darwin10-g++-4.2.1

linux g++ --version: g++ (Gentoo 4.3.3 p1.0, pie-10.1.5)

freebsd uname -a: 8.1-RELEASE FreeBSD 8.1-RELEASE

I use cmake to create the Makefile, so these are also similar on each platform

Here is the listing:

Header

#ifndef GUARD_Object_h
#define GUARD_Object_h

#include "boost/scoped_ptr.hpp"
#include "string"
#include "exception"

using std::string;

class Object
{
private:
    boost::scoped_ptr<string> _name;
public:
    Object(const string&);
    string getName();
};

class ObjectException:public std::exception
{
    virtual const char* what() const throw()
    {
        return "error not allowed";
    }
};

#endif

Main

#include "Object.h"

Object::Object(const string &name):_name (new string)
{
    *_name = name;
   if(*_name == "error") 
   {  
        throw ObjectException();
   }  
}

string Object::getName() 
{
    return *_name;
}

Main

#include <iostream>
#include "Object.h"

int main() 
{
    try
    {
        new Object("error");
    } catch(ObjectException& ) {
        std::cout << "error found" << std::endl;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Could you, please, change boost::scoped_ptr to boost::shared_ptr and test it again? –  skwllsp Jan 9 '11 at 21:20
    
shared_ptr gives same result, –  Cyberroadie Jan 9 '11 at 21:48
    
also when i don't use smart pointers it gets core dumped –  Cyberroadie Jan 9 '11 at 21:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Works for me on FreeBSD 8.1-RELEASE-p2 and OSX 10.6.6.

You could have a bad version of libstdc++ in your search path. When I link on FreeBSD 8.1, I get the following output from ldd:

janm@midgard: test3 $ ldd a.out
a.out:
    libstdc++.so.6 => /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6 (0x800649000)
    libm.so.5 => /lib/libm.so.5 (0x800854000)
    libgcc_s.so.1 => /lib/libgcc_s.so.1 (0x800973000)
    libc.so.7 => /lib/libc.so.7 (0x800a80000)

If yours looks significantly different you might have a runtime library mismatch. If you have a problem, you can try linking with "g++ -static" to statically link the runtime library at link time. If that works, you need to fix your machine.

Update:

It looks like your compiler and runtime library don't match, and that is probably caused by cmake configuration problem. You probably have installed a version of gcc into /usr/local, probably using a port.

If you compile with system gcc, you need to link with the runtime libraries in /usr/lib. If you compile with a gcc in /usr/local, you need to link with the libraries in /usr/local. If you're planning on shipping the binaries around, you should probably use system gcc or statically link.

Another option is to just uninstall the gcc port and try again, assuming you don't really care about the gcc port.

share|improve this answer
    
it works with -static, so i guess i have to reinstall, or is cmake linking the wrong libs? :-( –  Cyberroadie Jan 9 '11 at 23:38
    
You are getting gcc libraries from /usr/local/lib, so you probably have a gcc port installed, or you have installed gcc by hand. If you compile with system gcc, you need to link with the runtime libraries in /usr/lib. If you compile with a gcc in /usr/local, you need to link with the libraries in /usr/local. If you're planning on shipping the binaries around, you should probably use system gcc or statically link. Yes, you probably have a cmake configuration issue. –  janm Jan 10 '11 at 0:09
    
Another option is (if you don't care about the port gcc) is to just uninstall the gcc port and let cmake figure out the environment again and retry. –  janm Jan 10 '11 at 0:12
    
@Cyberroadie You can run find / -name libstdc++.so.6 to find out where different instances of libstdc++ live. –  Rudi Jan 18 '11 at 7:37

I compiled and ran your code on FreeBSD 8.1 without any problem (using g++ -I/usr/local/include -g Main.cpp Object.cpp). Maybe you need to upgrade (reinstall) boost on that computer?

share|improve this answer
    
I confirm this. Works fine on FreeBSD 8.1 and OSX 10.6.6 for me. What does the stack trace in the core dump say? –  janm Jan 9 '11 at 23:07
    
ah, it must be something with cmake, if I test it with the command you gave it actually work, if i compile with the cmake generated Makefile it core dumps –  Cyberroadie Jan 9 '11 at 23:21

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