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I need to write a function which receives two positive integers and returns them concatenated.

Example: Cat(12,13) returns 1213

I know how to do this the iterative way, it would be something like this:

int Cat(int num1, int num2)
{
     int temp = num2;

     while (temp > 0)
     {
         num1 *= 10;
         temp /= 10;
     }

     return num1 + num2;
}

But when I use recursion I can't use the temporary variable which will be used to count the digits, and if use the parameter I will lose its value.

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4  
If you want to treat the numbers as strings, then use strings. "Concatenation" is not something you do with integers. For one thing, "integer" is a concept that exists separately from how the number is represented. "Thirteen" is the same no matter what base you write it in, or if you represent it with 13 tally marks, or by drawing a completely made-up symbol that you then say represents that value. – Karl Knechtel Jan 9 '11 at 21:17
1  
Why do you need to write it recursively? Is this homework? What language? What have you tried so far? – templatetypedef Jan 9 '11 at 21:19
    
Because that is how the question defined. It's not exactly homework. And the language doesn't matter since it's more about the algorithm. I thought of the solution with the extra parameter but I'm looking for something with only two parameters. – Ben Jan 9 '11 at 21:33
    
This looks a lot like an exercise from "Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs". – pyon Jun 27 '11 at 19:06
    
You certainly can count the digits using a parameter. To do that, you need two functions. – pyon Jun 27 '11 at 19:12

You could add a third parameter to act as a sort of counter:

int Cat2(int num1, int num2, int x)
{
     if (x == 0) 
     {
         return num1 + num2;
     }
     else 
     {
         return Cat(num1 * 10, num2, x / 10);
     }
}

int Cat(int num1, int num2)
{
     Cat2(num1, num2, num2)
}
share|improve this answer
    
I though of this solution. But is there a way to this without the extra parameter? – Ben Jan 9 '11 at 21:23
    
@Ben: You could directly calculate first digit of a number using logarithms and so on. Why do you need it? – Mark Byers Jan 9 '11 at 21:32

This is not a "real life" task, is it? Anyway here's my proposition (recursive and without the third parameter)

int Cat(int num1, int num2)
{
    if(num2 > 0)
    {
        num1 = Cat(num1*10,num2/10);
    }
    return num1 - num2/10 + num2;
}
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You need your recursive routine to process one digit at a time, so the call chain would look like this:

Cat(12, 13)
Cat(121, 3)
Cat(1213, 0) <- at this point the recursion terminates, since num2 == 0

So your function will look something like this:

int Cat(int num1, int num2)
{
    if (num2 == 0)
    {
        return num1;
    }
    else
    {
        // remove most significant digit from num2 and
        // append it to num1
        return Cat(num1, num2);
    }
}
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What language are you using? you could simply cast them as strings and concatenate them that way.

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I'm not sure if you're engaged in this excercise as homework - in which case what I'm about to say may not work for you.

But assuming you wouldn't re-post your homework question to the Web and You Just Need To Get This Done, have you considered simply:

  • combining the two integers into a string on function entry
  • casting it back to an integer on function exit

for example (in Java pseudo code)

int cat(int x, int y) {
 String s = x+""+y;
 return Integer.parseInt(s);
}
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To codify what MrGlass said, why not use this code:

int Cat(int n1, int n2){
    String s1 = Integer.toString(n1);
    String s2 = Integer.toString(n2);

    return Integer.parseInt(s1+s2);
}

?

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int do_cat(int num1, int num2, int temp)
{
    return temp? do_cat(num1 * 10, num2, temp / 10): num1 + num2;
}

int cat(int num1, int num2)
{
    return do_cat(num1, num2, num1);
}
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Why do it with recursion anyway?

Code in python:

from math import log
def concat(a,b):
    return a * 10 ** int(log(b,10)+1) + b
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This is how it would have been solved in Scheme:

(define (Cat num1 num2)
    (define (CatLoop num1 num2 temp)
            (if (= temp 0)
                (+ num1 num2)
                (CatLoop (* num1 10) num2 (/ temp 10))))
    (CatLoop num1 num2 num2))

[It might contain syntax errors, I didn't test it.]

In a C-like language with nested functions:

int Cat(int num1, int num2) {
    int CatLoop(int num1, int num2, int temp) {
        if (temp == 0)
            return num1 + num2;
        else
            return CatLoop(num1 * 10, num2, temp / 10);
    }

    return CatLoop(num1, num2, num2);
}

After tail-call optimization, this gets unrolled into the following:

int Cat(int num1, int num2) {
    int temp = num2;
    // goto CatLoop;

    CatLoop:
    if (temp == 0)
        goto Done;

    Else:
    num1 *= 10;
    temp /= 10;
    goto CatLoop;

    Done:
    return num1 + num2;
}
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