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I'm working on a bit of a project in python. I have a client and a server. The server listens for connections and once a connection is received it waits for input from the client. The idea is that the client can connect to the server and execute system commands such as ls and cat. This is my server code:

import sys, os, socket


host = ''                
port = 50105

s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
s.bind((host, port))
print("Server started on port: ", port)

s.listen(5)
print("Server listening\n")
conn, addr = s.accept()
print 'New connection from ', addr
while (1):
    rc = conn.recv(5)
    pipe = os.popen(rc)
    rl = pipe.readlines()
    file = conn.makefile('w', 0)
    file.writelines(rl[:-1])
    file.close()
    conn.close()

And this is my client code:

import sys, socket
s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
host = 'localhost'
port = input('Port: ')
s.connect((host, port))
cmd = raw_input('$ ')
s.send(cmd) 
file = s.makefile('r', 0)
sys.stdout.writelines(file.readlines())

When I start the server I get the right output, saying the server is listening. But when I connect with my client and type a command the server exits with this error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
File "server.py", line 21, in <module>
  rc = conn.recv(2)
File "/usr/lib/python2.6/socket.py", line 165, in _dummy
  raise error(EBADF, 'Bad file descriptor')
socket.error: [Errno 9] Bad file descriptor

On the client side, I get the output of ls but the server gets screwed up.

share|improve this question
1  
So what exactly is your question? –  Sven Marnach Jan 10 '11 at 0:34
    
How can I make it so the client will stay open for more commands to be inputed. So that the client can keep inputting commands and they're executed on the server. –  AustinM Jan 10 '11 at 0:39
1  
You seem to be reinventing ssh, why? –  nosklo Jan 10 '11 at 0:41
    
It's not really reinventing SSH its just a basic server client program where the client can remotely execute commands. Not on level of security SSH provides though. Just simple. Kinda like telnet. –  AustinM Jan 10 '11 at 0:42
1  
If you really want to learn about this, get the book "Advanced Programming in a Unix Environment" second edition... It will explain everything you need to get moving on client/server programming. –  gahooa Jan 10 '11 at 1:07
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your code calls conn.close() and then loops back around to conn.recv(), but conn is already closed.

share|improve this answer
    
I took conn.close() out of the server and now when I type a command in the client it just hangs. Nothing happens. –  AustinM Jan 9 '11 at 22:55
    
In that case, your file.readlines() in the client is waiting for the server to send something more (because it might). You'll have to decide - do you want your server to accept one command and then close the connection, or do you want the server to send something that indicates the command output has completed? If the latter, what would you like to send? –  Greg Hewgill Jan 9 '11 at 22:59
    
Well I want the server to send something that indicates the command output has completed. The idea is that the server stays listening for connections and the client can enter a command, get the output of it, then enter more commands if the user wishes. –  AustinM Jan 9 '11 at 23:02
    
There are two alternatives - the server can stay listening for new connections, even if each individual connection is closed after the command has completed (this is sort of like how simple HTTP works). This has the advantage of being much simpler to code. The alternative is to have the connection between the client and server stay connected for multiple commands, but you'll have to choose some way of marking the end of server command output so the client knows when to show the next prompt. The trick is choosing something that isn't going to show up in command output itself. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 9 '11 at 23:05
2  
As a third option, you could have the server generate the prompt when it's done executing the command. Then the client becomes very simple, and just passes characters back and forth. In fact, at that point you're well on your way to reinventing telnet. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 9 '11 at 23:06
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If you want your client to repeat what it's doing, just add a loop in there ;)

s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
host = 'localhost'
port = input('Port: ')
s.connect((host, port))
while True:
    cmd = raw_input('$ ')
    s.send(cmd) 
    file = s.makefile('r', 0)
    sys.stdout.writelines(file.readlines())

Should probably be closer to what you want.

Other comments:

s.listen(1)

This statement should probably be moved outside of the while loop. You only need to call listen once.

pipe = os.popen(rc)

os.popen has been deprecated, use the subprocess module instead.

file = s.makefile('r', 0)

You're opening a file, yet you never close the file. You should probably add a file.close() after your sys.stdout.writelines() call.

EDIT: to answer below comment; done here due to length and formatting

As it stands, you read from the socket once, and then immediately close it. Thus, when the client goes to send the next command, it sees that the server closed the socket and indicates an error.

The solution is to change your server code so that it can handle receiving multiple commands. Note that this is solved by introducing another loop.

You need to wrap

rc = conn.recv(2)
pipe = os.popen(rc)
rl = pipe.readlines()
fl = conn.makefile('w', 0)
fl.writelines(rl[:-1])

in another while True: loop so that it repeats until the client disconnects, and then wrap that in a try-except block that catches the IOError that is thrown by conn.recv() when the client disconnects.

the try-except block should look like

try:
    # the described above loop goes here
except IOError:
    conn.close()
# execution continues on...
share|improve this answer
    
Well the loop works great as once a command is entered, it's executed on the server machine, I get the output on my client machine and then I get the '$' prompt again. The thing is, after that when I type another command nothing happens. Then if I try another command I get an error socket.error: [Errno 32] Broken pipe –  AustinM Jan 10 '11 at 2:21
    
Hm interesting. Now the client just hangs and I don't get the output of the command until the server is closed. –  AustinM Jan 10 '11 at 19:30
    
Changing fl = conn.makefile('w', 0) to fl = conn.makefile('w') fixed it for me. Setting the second argument, which is a buffer size, to 0 seemed to not work out that well. –  Alex Miller Jan 10 '11 at 23:49
    
I also had to add if len(rc) == 0: raise IOError after rc = conn.recv(2) because for me, when recv was called on a socket that was closed on the other end, it just returned nothing. I thought that it should raise an IOError, but I guess it doesn't? (If someone else could jump in here and explain why, it'd be appreciated.) –  Alex Miller Jan 11 '11 at 0:06
    
Alright I've done everything suggested and I'm still getting the same exact problem -_- It still hangs until the server is closed. Just to make sure heres my server/client: pastie.org/1447201 –  AustinM Jan 11 '11 at 2:56
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