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public class Converter
{
    private Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(Converter.class);
    public String convert(String s){ 
         if (s == null) throw new IllegalArgumentException("input can't be null");
         logger.debug("Input = " + s);
         String r = s + "abc";
         logger.debug("Output = " + s);
         return r;
    }

    public Integer convert(Integer s){
         if (s == null) throw new IllegalArgumentException("input can't be null");
         logger.debug("Input = " + s);
         Integer r = s + 10;
         logger.debug("Output = " + s);
         return r;
    }
}

The above 2 methods are very similar so I want to create a template to do the similar things and delegate the actual work to the approriate class. But I also want to easily extends this frame work without changing the template. So for example:

public class ConverterTemplate
{
    private Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(Converter.class);
    public Object convert(Object s){ 
         if (s == null) throw new IllegalArgumentException("input can't be null");
         logger.debug("Input = " + s);
         Object r = doConverter();
         logger.debug("Output = " + s);
         return r;
    }

    protected abstract Object doConverter(Object arg);
}

public class MyConverter extends ConverterTemplate
{
    protected String doConverter(String str)
    {
       String r = str + "abc";
       return r;
    }

    protected Integer doConverter(Integer arg)
    {
       Integer r = arg + 10;
       return r;
    }
}

But that doesn't work. Can anybody suggest me a better way to do that? I want to achieve 2 goals: 1. A template that is extensible and does all the similar work for me. 2. I ant to minimize the number of extended class.

Thanks,

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2  
Take a look at Generics. –  Anon. Jan 9 '11 at 22:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use generics, make convert method final (so it is not overridden when you want to keep this template) and make converter implementation for each type in separate class:

public interface Converter<T> {

    public T convert(T s);
}


public abstract class AbstractConverter<T> implements Converter<T> {

    @Override
    public final T convert(T s) {
         if (s == null) throw new IllegalArgumentException("input can't be null");
         //logger.debug("Input = " + s);
         T r = doConverter(s);
         //logger.debug("Output = " + s);
         return r;
    }

    public abstract T doConverter(T s);
}


public class StringConverter extends AbstractConverter<String> {

    public String doConverter(String s) {
        String r = s + "abc";
        return r;
    };
}

public class IntegerConverter extends AbstractConverter<Integer> {

    public Integer doConverter(Integer s) {
        Integer r = s + 10;
        return r;
    };
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This interface is equivalent to Function, guava-libraries.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/javadoc/com/google/…. That also has useful utility methods in Functions, guava-libraries.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/javadoc/com/google/…. –  sjr Jan 9 '11 at 23:23

This is a perfect case to use generics. More specifically you can specify that the parent class have a "generic" class that it takes and uses for doConvert. Then the extensions would each specify the type of class that they are using.

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