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How do i Invoke items so the TestAction do write out "s.Hello"? Right now i don't do anything, it jumps over the "action = s.." line.

Or is the another way to do this? Since i don't want to return any code i use the Action instead of Func

I just started to work with Action.

public class Items
{
    public string Hello { get; set; }
}

public class TestClass
{
    public void TestAction(Action<Items> action)
    {
        action = s => Console.WriteLine(s.Hello);
    }

    public TestClass()
    {
        TestAction(b => b.Hello = "Hello world!");
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Let's drill down your code, from the bottom of the stacktrace.

  1. TestAction(b => b.Hello = "Hello world!");

You are supplying a lambda that assigns b.Hello as "Hello World".

  1. action = s => Console.WriteLine(s.Hello);

You are assigning that same delegate a new lambda.

You aren't actually doing anything with them - you are just generating a delegate. To execute that delegate, you need an argument of class Items. What you really want is to call the action with such an argument.

public class TestClass
{
    public void TestAction(Action<Items> action)
    {
        Items i = new Item() { Hello = "Hello World");
        action(i);
    }

    public TestClass()
    {
        TestAction(b => Console.WriteLine(b.Hello));
    }
}
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It's not an expression tree. That would be Expression<Action<Items>>. Other than that, good answer. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 10 '11 at 0:38
    
The lambda itself is one though. But I could be wrong about that... At least I got that impression from the stuff I've been doing with Expression Trees lately (create one and create a delegate via .Compile(). Exchanged the mention with delegate though, as I'm not sure. –  Femaref Jan 10 '11 at 0:42
    
This code does not generate and compile a tree. The compilation is done at compile-time (I know that sounds weird). No classes from the System.Linq.Expressions namespace are used by this code. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 10 '11 at 0:51
    
Nah, it doesn't sound weird, the only thing weird about it are the class names generated by the compiler ;) Of course you are right. However, you can generate delegates from expression trees at runtime, which is an extremely cool feature and would've forced me to use lots of reflection if it wouldn't have existed. –  Femaref Jan 10 '11 at 0:55

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