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I have the following two action methods (simplified for question):

[HttpGet]
public ActionResult Create(string uniqueUri)
{
   // get some stuff based on uniqueuri, set in ViewData.  
   return View();
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(Review review)
{
   // validate review
   if (validatedOk)
   {
      return RedirectToAction("Details", new { postId = review.PostId});
   }  
   else
   {
      ModelState.AddModelError("ReviewErrors", "some error occured");
      return RedirectToAction("Create", new { uniqueUri = Request.RequestContext.RouteData.Values["uniqueUri"]});
   }   
}

So, if the validation passes, i redirect to another page (confirmation).

If an error occurs, i need to display the same page with the error.

If i do return View(), the error is displayed, but if i do return RedirectToAction (as above), it loses the Model errors.

I'm not surprised by the issue, just wondering how you guys handle this?

I could of course just return the same View instead of the redirect, but i have logic in the "Create" method which populates the view data, which i'd have to duplicate.

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
5  
I solve this problem by not using the Post-Redirect-Get pattern for validation errors. I just use View(). It's perfectly valid to do that instead of jumping through a bunch of hoops - and redirect messes with your browser history. –  Jimmy Bogard Feb 7 '13 at 19:39
    
And in addition to what @JimmyBogard has said, extract out the logic in the Create method which populates ViewData and call it in the Create GET method and also in the failed validation branch in the Create POST method. –  Russ Cam Feb 7 '13 at 20:00
    
Agreed, avoiding the problem is one way of solving it. I have some logic to populate stuff in my Create view, I just put it in some method populateStuff that I call in both the GET and the fail POST. –  Francois Joly Feb 7 '13 at 20:01
2  
@JimmyBogard I disagree, if you post to an action and then return the view you run into the issue where if the user hits refresh they get the warning about wanting to initiate that post again. –  The Muffin Man Jan 19 '14 at 18:31

6 Answers 6

up vote 28 down vote accepted

You need to have the same instance of Review on your HttpGet action. To do that you should save an object Review review in temp variable on your HttpPost action and then restore it on HttpGet action.

[HttpGet]
public ActionResult Create(string uniqueUri)
{
   //Restore
   Review review = TempData["Review"] as Review;            

   // get some stuff based on uniqueuri, set in ViewData.  
   return View(review);
}
[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(Review review)
{
   //Save you object
   TempData["Review"] = review;

   // validate review
   if (validatedOk)
   {
      return RedirectToAction("Details", new { postId = review.PostId});
   }  
   else
   {
      ModelState.AddModelError("ReviewErrors", "some error occured");
      return RedirectToAction("Create", new { uniqueUri = Request.RequestContext.RouteData.Values["uniqueUri"]});
   }   
}

Also i would advice, if you want to make it work also when browser refresh button pressed after HttpGet action executed first time, you may go like that

  Review review = TempData["Review"] as Review;  
  TempData["Review"] = review;

Otherwise on refresh button object review will be empty because there wouldn't be any data in TempData["Review"].

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent. And a big +1 for mentioning the refresh issue. This is the most complete answer so i'll accept it, thanks a bunch. :) –  RPM1984 Jan 10 '11 at 2:31
6  
This doesn't really answer the question in the title. ModelState isn't preserved and that has ramifications such as input HtmlHelpers not preserving user entry. This is almost a workaround. –  jfar Jan 10 '11 at 3:18
    
I ended up doing what @Wim suggested in his answer. –  RPM1984 Jan 10 '11 at 22:19
11  
@jfar, I agree, this answer doesn't work and does not persist the ModelState. However, if you modify it so it does something like TempData["ModelState"] = ModelState; and restore with ModelState.Merge((ModelStateDictionary)TempData["ModelState"]);, then it would work –  asgeo1 Aug 19 '12 at 4:17
1  
Could you not just return Create(uniqueUri) when validation fails on the POST? As ModelState values take precedence over the ViewModel passed in to the view, the posted data should still remain. –  ajbeaven Jun 15 '13 at 12:48

I had to solve this problem today myself, and came across this question.

Some of the answers are useful (using TempData), but don't really answer the question at hand.

The best advice I found was on this blog post:

http://www.jefclaes.be/2012/06/persisting-model-state-when-using-prg.html

Basically, use TempData to save and restore the ModelState object. However, it's a lot cleaner if you abstract this away into attributes.

E.g.

public class SetTempDataModelStateAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    {
        base.OnActionExecuted(filterContext);         
        filterContext.Controller.TempData["ModelState"] = 
           filterContext.Controller.ViewData.ModelState;
    }
}

public class RestoreModelStateFromTempDataAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        base.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);
        if (filterContext.Controller.TempData.ContainsKey("ModelState"))
        {
            filterContext.Controller.ViewData.ModelState.Merge(
                (ModelStateDictionary)filterContext.Controller.TempData["ModelState"]);
        }
    }
}

Then as per your example, you could save / restore the ModelState like so:

[HttpGet]
[RestoreModelStateFromTempData]
public ActionResult Create(string uniqueUri)
{
    // get some stuff based on uniqueuri, set in ViewData.  
    return View();
}

[HttpPost]
[SetTempDataModelState]
public ActionResult Create(Review review)
{
    // validate review
    if (validatedOk)
    {
        return RedirectToAction("Details", new { postId = review.PostId});
    }  
    else
    {
        ModelState.AddModelError("ReviewErrors", "some error occured");
        return RedirectToAction("Create", new { uniqueUri = Request.RequestContext.RouteData.Values["uniqueUri"]});
    }   
}

If you also want to pass the model along in TempData (as bigb suggested) then you can still do that too.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. We implemented something similar to your approach. gist.github.com/ferventcoder/4735084 –  ferventcoder Feb 7 '13 at 23:39
    
Great answer. Thanks. –  Mark Vickery Mar 25 '14 at 13:48
    
This solution is the reason I use stackoverflow. Thanks man! –  jugg1es May 25 '14 at 20:17
    
@asgeo1 - great solution, but I ran into a problem using it in combination with repeating Partial Views, I posted the question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/28372330/… –  Josh Feb 6 at 18:27
    
Lovely example of taking the simple solution and making it very elegant, in the spirit of MVC. Very nice! –  AHowgego May 7 at 14:32

I suggest you return the view, and avoid duplication via an attribute on the action. Here is an example of populating to view data. You could do something similar with your create method logic.

public class GetStuffBasedOnUniqueUriAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        var filter = new GetStuffBasedOnUniqueUriFilter();

        filter.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);
    }
}


public class GetStuffBasedOnUniqueUriFilter : IActionFilter
{
    #region IActionFilter Members

    public void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    {

    }

    public void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        filterContext.Controller.ViewData["somekey"] = filterContext.RouteData.Values["uniqueUri"];
    }

    #endregion
}

And for those that just had a hard time imagining how this would work:

[HttpGet, GetStuffBasedOnUniqueUri]
public ActionResult Create()
{
    return View();
}

[HttpPost, GetStuffBasedOnUniqueUri]
public ActionResult Create(Review review)
{
    // validate review
    if (validatedOk)
    {
        return RedirectToAction("Details", new { postId = review.PostId });
    }

    ModelState.AddModelError("ReviewErrors", "some error occured");
    return View(review);
}
share|improve this answer
    
How is this a bad idea? I think the attribute avoids the need to use another action because both actions can use the attribute to load to ViewData. –  CRice Jan 10 '11 at 1:07
1  
Please take a look at Post/Redirect/Get pattern: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post/Redirect/Get –  DreamSonic Jan 10 '11 at 1:13
1  
That is normally used after model validation is satisfied, to prevent further posts to the same form on refresh. But if the form has issues, then it needs to be corrected and reposted anyway. This question deals with handling model errors. –  CRice Jan 10 '11 at 1:23
    
Filters are for reusable code on actions, especially useful for putting things in ViewData. TempData is just a workaround. –  CRice Jan 18 '11 at 4:23
1  
@ppumkin maybe try posting with ajax so that you don't have a hard time rebuilding your view server side. –  CRice Feb 25 at 22:45

I could use TempData["Errors"]

TempData are passed accross actions preserving data 1 time.

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Why not create a private function with the logic in the "Create" method and calling this method from both the Get and the Post method and just do return View().

share|improve this answer
    
This is actually what i ended up doing - you read my mind. +1 :) –  RPM1984 Jan 10 '11 at 22:18
    
This is what I do too, only instead of having a private function, I simply have my POST method call the GET method on error (i.e. return Create(new { uniqueUri = ... });. Your logic stays DRY (much like calling RedirectToAction), but without the issues carried by redirecting, such as losing your ModelState. –  Daniel Liuzzi May 7 '12 at 23:41
    
@DanielLiuzzi: doing it that way will not change the URL. So you end with url something like "/controller/create/". –  Skorunka František Jun 9 '12 at 12:31
    
@SkorunkaFrantišek And that's exactly the point. The question states If an error occurs, I need to display the same page with the error. In this context, it is perfectly acceptable (and preferable IMO) that the URL does NOT change if the same page is displayed. Also, one advantage this approach has is that if the error in question is not a validation error but a system error (DB timeout for example) it allows the user to simply refresh the page to resubmit the form. –  Daniel Liuzzi Jun 11 '12 at 21:57

I have a method that adds model state to temp data. I then have a method in my base controller that checks temp data for any errors. If it has them, it adds them back to ModelState.

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