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I've been reviewing the draft version of the C++11 standard. Specifically the section on lambdas, and I am confused as to the reasoning for not introducing polymorphic lambdas.

For example, amongst the 100001 ways polymorphic lambdas could be used, I had hoped we could use code such as the following:

template<typename Container>
void foo(Container c)
{
    for_each(c.begin(), c.end(), [](T& t) { ++t; });
}

What were the reasons:

  • Was it that the committee ran out of time?

  • That polymorphic lambdas are too hard to implement?

  • Or perhaps that they are seen as not being needed by the PTB?

Note: Please remember the example above is not the only one, and it is only provided as a guide to the types of code. Answers that solely concentrate on providing a workaround for the above piece of code will not be considered as valid!

Related sources:

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9  
damn, what a messed up syntax. –  Femaref Jan 10 '11 at 1:38
19  
whats wrong with the syntax? its actually quite nice. –  Matthieu N. Jan 10 '11 at 1:46
7  
@Dominar That's what "close over" means. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Closure_(computer_programming) –  etarion Jan 10 '11 at 1:54
5  
@Kirakun: It would be an interesting experiment to remove everything that has been made redundant by later extensions (e.g. remove all forms of initialization except the uniform initialization syntax), keep the abstract syntax for that non-redundant subset of C++ identical to what it is today, but design a new concrete syntax more along the lines of Scala and/or Cobra and/or Ruby (depending on whether you prefer braces, indentation or keywords). I bet you can get some rather nice looking language that is 100% isomorphic to C++. –  Jörg W Mittag Jan 10 '11 at 2:25
9  
Meh. I can live without it. [](decltype(*begin) t) { ++t; } –  Jon Purdy Jan 10 '11 at 3:11
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5 Answers

Since the argument, c, meets the STL requirements for a container, you should be able to use something like

template<typename Container>
void foo(Container c)
{
    for_each(c.begin(), c.end(),[](typename Container::reference t) { ++t; });
}

I'll also showcase John Purdy's comment above, which is another way to get the typename you want in this lambda:

template<typename Container>
void foo(Container c)
{
   for_each(c.begin(),c.end(),[](decltype(*c.begin()) t) { ++t; });
}

(Yes, Dominar, I know you don't like this answer, because it doesn't answer your question, but I'm willing to bet that the next person who comes along asking this question is going to be looking for a way to make their code work, so it does make sense to have some techniques around where the question is relevant.)

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7  
Ken: Not sure what you're on about as the compilers already do something very similar: codepad.org/BoaD4Mhi –  Matthieu N. Jan 10 '11 at 1:45
12  
Who are the people up-voting this answer? This is NOT a correct answer, and will NOT be chosen as the correct answer. –  Matthieu N. Jan 10 '11 at 1:46
1  
@Dominar: You're right. I think my mind has been corrupted by Scala generics or something. I can't quite figure out the mental gymnastics to understand what the C++ compiler does to get that right. –  Ken Bloom Jan 10 '11 at 1:48
5  
@Ken: In fact it can, the ground work for such type deduction was set back in the 03 standard. Please remove your answer as I'm only looking for correct answers, I'd hate to send people on a wild-goose-red-herring chase :D –  Matthieu N. Jan 10 '11 at 1:50
2  
Downvoted for not answering the question –  Dave Abrahams Dec 21 '11 at 19:10
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The reason we don't have polymorphic lambdas is explained pretty well in this posting.

It has to do with the concepts feature that was pulled from C++11: essentially, polymorphic lambdas are ordinary, unconstrained function templates and we didn't know how to typecheck a concept-constrained template that used an unconstrained template. However, solving that problem turns out to be easy as shown here, so I don't think there's any obstacle remaining.

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7  
Here's the REAL answer with only two upvotes... –  vines Jan 21 '12 at 3:41
2  
Note that our proposal for polymorphic lambdas was looked upon favorably by the Evolution Working Group in Portland, so if we refine the proposal according to those comments, I think we'll see the feature in C++2014. –  Dave Abrahams Nov 17 '12 at 2:58
    
1+ Excellent answer. –  Zamfir Kerlukson Feb 10 '13 at 9:20
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It's probably because there already is a syntax for doing that, and the purpose of lambdas is to introduce a much simpler syntax that covers most cases. When you try to cover all cases (what if you wanted the auto-generated functor to inherit a particular base class?), you lose the comparative advantages (simplicity and terseness) of the lambda.

I really don't like the proposed syntax. Is T a keyword? Do all identifiers for which name lookup fails get turned automatically into template typename arguments? That prevents you from detecting misspellings, which IMO is a BAD idea:

for_each(c.begin(),c.end(),[](iterater& t) { ++t; });
// programmer misspelled "iterator" and now has a polymorphic lambda, oops

It also introduces action-at-a-distance behavior, if the named type get introduced in some header file somewhere, the meaning changes suddenly. Also really BAD.

Well, since it's supposed to create a template, we could borrow the existing syntax:

for_each(c.begin(),c.end(),[]template<typename T>(T& t) { ++t; });

This is unambiguous and now allows non-type template arguments (useful for accepting arrays by reference), but is really unwieldy. At this point you're better off writing out the functor by hand, it'll be much easier to understand.

However, I think a simple syntax is possible using the auto keyword:

for_each(c.begin(),c.end(),[](auto& t) { ++t; });

This next section incorrectly assumes that the template parameter appears on the functor type rather than its operator()():

But now you have a problem that for_each infers a typename template argument, not a template template argument. Type inference isn't possible in that context.

In the current proposal, lambdas have type, even if it's an unmentionable (other than decltype) type. You'd have to lose that feature in order to accommodate inference at the call-site.

Example showing that the issue is NOT a shortcoming of lambdas, it's simply a non-deducible context:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

int main(void)
{
    using namespace std;
    vector<int> a(10);
    vector<int> b(10);
    vector<int> results;

    transform(a.begin(), a.end(), b.begin(), back_inserter(results), min<int>);
}

The template type parameter to std::min must be explicitly specified. Lambdas are no different from using existing functors in this regard.

EDIT: Ok, now that I realize we aren't suggesting that the lambda generate a template functor type, but a single non-template functor type which implements a templated function application operator (operator()()), I agree that the compiler should be able to generate such a thing. I propose that using the auto keyword here would be a good simple syntax for requesting that.

However, I'm not really happy with auto either. What about lambdas with multiple parameters:

[](auto& x, auto& y){ return x + y; }
//becomes
template<typename T1, typename T2>
auto operator()(T1& x, T2& y) -> decltype(x + y) { return x + y; }

Ok, that works well enough, but what if we wanted two parameters but only one type argument:

[](auto& x, decltype(x)& y){ return x + y; }
//becomes
template<typename T1>
auto operator()(T1& x, T1& y) -> decltype(x + y) { return x + y; }

Seems ok, but I find the syntax misleading. The syntax suggests that the type parameter is inferred from the first actual parameter, and the second parameter is coerced to the same type, but actually both actual parameters are considered equal during type inference.

Perhaps it's best that this case be limited to one lambda parameter per type argument, and if you want something more constrained, write the functor yourself. This seems to me to be a good compromise between flexibility and power vs keeping the syntax simple.

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1  
Interesting conclusions, but I don't think they are generally valid please read the following: open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2002/n1375.html As I mentioned at the bottom of the question, the example is just an example. but +1 for being a far better answer than whats already there. –  Matthieu N. Jan 10 '11 at 2:36
    
So just to clarify, the (auto& t) syntax doesn't actually work, but you think that the C++ standards committee should have made it work because it captures this really reasonable use case without the lambda syntax getting too bad. –  Ken Bloom Jan 10 '11 at 2:36
3  
If they had something in the standard library like: template <typename T> using id = T; then you could do [](auto& x, std::id<x>& y) to stop deduction. I think it's still viable, just needs more utility functionality. Roger Pate and I discussed this a while ago before he left. With the new language, you could actually get rid of explicit template syntax, and just use auto in the parameter type. (Any function that did so had an implicit template <typename __...>.) It would simplify templates greatly. –  GManNickG Jan 10 '11 at 16:45
1  
@GMan: Wouldn't that actually require something like std::id<decltype(x)>? Getting ugly, but perhaps necessary. And I don't think that auto could replace explicit template notation in the general case, but it sure would be a nice shorthand to simplify writing a significant fraction of template functions. –  Ben Voigt Jan 10 '11 at 18:40
1  
Why not just add more brackets? <typename T>[](T& x, T& y){x++; y--;} –  Ken Bloom Jan 11 '11 at 14:11
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Well, now that you've linked n1968, the answer to your question is apparent. It's found in section 5.1 of the proposal.

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3  
True. But jeez, I can't say I agree with the reasoning. I'm starting to wonder if the addition of concepts is at all desirable. It was supposed to improve template error messages, not prevent implementation of intuitive and useful language features. –  jalf Jan 10 '11 at 10:16
2  
@jalf: I'm pretty sure that's why they died. Concepts were enormously complex, it would be like learning a second language on top of the first. –  GManNickG Jan 10 '11 at 16:08
    
@GMan: But... I thought the official word was that they aren't actually dead, they just missed the deadline. Although the originally proposed syntax may very well be dead. –  Ben Voigt Jan 10 '11 at 16:11
    
@Ben: Sorry, ambiguous wording on my part. "died" meant "didn't make it [into the new standard]". –  GManNickG Jan 10 '11 at 16:42
1  
Yeah, but I'm starting to wonder if they're dead enough. The more I learn about the concepts proposal, the more I feel it was just misguided. Too big and too ambitious, sure, but also compromising a lot of valuable aspects of the C++ language, possibly making generic code harder to write. So if and when Concepts get resurrected, I'm hoping they'll take a big step back and really reconsider what they're trying to achieve. And @Ben, I think they've said they're aiming for a 5-year'ish schedule going forward, so you might get new features in less than a decade. ;) –  jalf Jan 10 '11 at 23:53
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The following (your comment to my other answer above) works:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

struct foo
{
   template<typename T>
   void operator()(T& t)
   {
      ++t;
   }
};

int main()
{

   std::vector<int> v;
   std::for_each(v.begin (),v.end(),foo());

   return 0;
}

But the following does not:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

template<typename T>
struct foo
{
   void operator()(T& t)
   {
      ++t;
   }
};

int main()
{

   std::vector<int> v;
   std::for_each(v.begin (),v.end(),foo()); // <-- the syntax for foo here 
                                            //     is kinda fictitious

   return 0;
}

Probably the C++ committee saw lambdas as being more similar to the second example than the first. (Though I haven't figured out clever way to define a lambda in which this would make a difference. Anyone got any crazy ideas?)

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9  
@Ken: becuase foo() is an inline instantiation, you need to specialize it at instantiation - there is nothing crazy about it, if you did foo<int>() it would work. codepad.org/VtLmqNlW –  Matthieu N. Jan 10 '11 at 2:54
2  
@Ben: I deleted it because it wasn't exactly like the code Ken had, I thought something that was exactly like what Ken had would be better as he seems to only understand very narrow/strict definitions of problems. –  Matthieu N. Jan 10 '11 at 2:56
7  
@Ken: That's fine for people who understand and know what the question is about, you have proven that you have grasped neither. So it makes sense for you not to edit, and as to why I made the original comment, by using std::iterator_traits you can deduce type via the value_type, so your change really added nothing and infact added even more confusion. The best thing you could have done from the start was to delete your answer, stay quite follow the question and let others educate you. –  Matthieu N. Jan 10 '11 at 3:39
1  
@MSalters: The edit being discussed is on the question not the answer. And lambdas most definitely are syntactic sugar for objects implementing operator()(). –  Ben Voigt Jan 10 '11 at 15:04
4  
@MSalters: I think you should learn to read the question, just out of curiosity, you wouldn't happen to be one of the puppets voting on Ken Blooms answers? for someone with 27k points, you don't seem to be clued in on the subject matter. –  Matthieu N. Jan 11 '11 at 6:23
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