Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class which has direct dependency on the RestTemplate. I wish I have a JUnit test of it, offline.

How could I mock a RestTemplate in my unittest?

share|improve this question
    
Check out my answer here stackoverflow.com/a/22334918/1077708 –  vincentjames501 Mar 11 at 19:49
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

I suggest refactoring your client code to remove the direct dependency on RestTemplate, and replace it with references to RestOperations, which is the interface implemented by RestTemplate. and the one you should be coding to.

You can then inject a stub or mock of RestOperations into your code for unit testing, and inject a RestTemplate when using it for real.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Sping 3.0 introduced RestTemplate. Since version 3.2, the Spring MVC test framework has provided the class MockRestServiceServer for unit testing client REST code.

share|improve this answer
    
Is it available on Android? –  Piotr Feb 14 at 21:43
1  
@Piotr, This is working for me with gradle: androidTestCompile("org.springframework:spring-test:3.2.8.RELEASE") { exclude module: "spring-core" } –  vincentjames501 Mar 11 at 19:12
add comment

You can use the Mock classes in package org.springframework.mock.web.

Usually you will need MockHttpServletRequest and MockHttpServletResponse, but if you need more control you may also need others, e.g. MockRequestDispatcher.

Both of these implement the corresponding Servlet interfaces but add convenience methods for testing (and, most importantly: they work without a real HTTP connection).

You can find the Mock classes in the spring-test jar (accessible through Maven)


Update: it seems that the above classes are no great help for RestTemplate after all. What you will need is to create a mock ClientHttpRequestFactory, and I'm surprised to see that there isn't one in the above package. Here is some code to get you started (haven't tested it):

public class MockClientHttpRequestFactory implements
    ClientHttpRequestFactory{

    // overwrite this if you want
    protected MockClientHttpResponse createResponse(){
        return new MockClientHttpResponse();
    }

    // or this
    protected HttpStatus getHttpStatusCode(){
        return HttpStatus.OK;
    }

    // or even this
    @Override
    public ClientHttpRequest createRequest(final URI uri,
        final HttpMethod httpMethod) throws IOException{
        return new MockClientHttpRequest(uri, httpMethod);
    }

    public class MockClientHttpResponse implements ClientHttpResponse{
        private final byte[] data = new byte[10000];
        private final InputStream body = new ByteArrayInputStream(data);
        private final HttpHeaders headers = new HttpHeaders();
        private HttpStatus status;

        @Override
        public InputStream getBody() throws IOException{
            return body;
        }

        @Override
        public HttpHeaders getHeaders(){
            return headers;
        }

        @Override
        public HttpStatus getStatusCode() throws IOException{
            return getHttpStatusCode();
        }

        @Override
        public String getStatusText() throws IOException{
            return status.name();
        }

        @Override
        public void close(){
            try{
                body.close();
            } catch(final IOException e){
                throw new IllegalStateException(e);
            }

        }

    }

    class MockClientHttpRequest implements ClientHttpRequest{

        private final HttpHeaders headers = new HttpHeaders();
        private final HttpMethod method;
        private final URI uri;
        private final OutputStream body = new ByteArrayOutputStream();

        MockClientHttpRequest(final URI uri, final HttpMethod httpMethod){
            this.uri = uri;
            method = httpMethod;

        }

        @Override
        public OutputStream getBody() throws IOException{
            return body;
        }

        @Override
        public HttpHeaders getHeaders(){
            return headers;
        }

        @Override
        public HttpMethod getMethod(){
            return method;
        }

        @Override
        public URI getURI(){
            return uri;
        }

        @Override
        public ClientHttpResponse execute() throws IOException{
            return createResponse();
        }

    }


}
share|improve this answer
1  
You did not answer my question. Your solution do help on the test of the server side servlet, MVC framework. I am going to test the client side, who use the MVC framework. –  Dennis Cheung Jan 10 '11 at 8:54
    
@Dennis okay, I updated my answer –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 10 '11 at 9:32
1  
This is just what I was after for one of my REST projects. Thanks very much. –  Elwood Dec 5 '11 at 17:22
    
(+1) the idea works. But I have the feeling, that the two methods getStatusCode and getStatusText in MockClientHttpResponse suffering a bit from Schizophrenia. May getStatusText(){return this.getStatusCode().name();} would heal them. ;-) –  Ralph Feb 8 '12 at 17:30
    
@Ralph yup, sounds ok –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 8 '12 at 17:33
add comment

spring-social-test contains mockup classes that help write tests for RestTemplate. There are also some examples on how to use it within the git repository (e.g. OAuth1TemplateTest).

Please keep in mind that there's currently a Spring feature request (#SPR-7951) to move these classes to spring-web.

share|improve this answer
    
This is very useful for testing rest clients. –  Johan Sjöberg Jan 17 '12 at 17:14
    
they moved this into spring-test-mvc –  mfirry Apr 19 '12 at 21:16
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.