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I'm in the process of switching to Linux for development, and I'm puzzled about how to maintain a good FHS compliancy in my programs.

For example, under Windows, I know that all the resources (Bitmaps, audio data, etc.) that my program will need can be found with relative paths from the executable, so its the same if I'm running the program from my development directory, or from an installation (Under "Program Files" for example), the program will be able to locate all its files.

Now, under Linux, I see that usually the executable goes under /usr/local/bin and its resources on /usr/local/share. (And the truth is that I'm not even sure of this)

For convenience reasons (such as version control) I'd like to have all the files pertaining to the project under a same path, say, for example, project/src for the source and project/data for resource files.

Is there any standard or recommended way to let me just rebuild the binary for testing and use the files on the project/data directory, while also being able to locate the files when they are under /usr/local/share?

I thought for example of setting a symlink under /usr/local/share pointing to my resources dir, and then just hardcode that path inside my program, but I feel its quite hackish and not very portable.

Also, I thought of running an install script that copies all the resources to /usr/local/share everytime I change, or add resources, but I also feel its not a good way to do it.

Could anyone tell me or point me to where it tells how this issue is usually resolved?

Thanks!

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1  
+1 Great question. I'm in the same situation and still searching for good documentation on workflows for Linux development. –  harpo Feb 13 '11 at 20:38

3 Answers 3

For convenience reasons (such as version control) I'd like to have all the files pertaining to the project under a same path, say, for example, project/src for the source and project/data for resource files.

You can organize your source tree as you wish — it need not bear any resemblance to the FHS layout desired of installed software.

I see that usually the executable goes under /usr/local/bin and its resources on /usr/local/share. (And the truth is that I'm not even sure of this)

The standard prefix is /usr. /usr/local is for, well, "local installations" as the FHS spec reiterates.

Is there any standard or recommended way to let me just rebuild the binary for testing and use the files on the project/data directory

Definitely. Run ./configure --datadir=$PWD/share for example is the way to point your build to the data files form the source tree (substitute by proper path) and use something like -DDATADIR="'${datadir}'" in AM_CFLAGS to make the value known to the (presumably C) code. (All of that, provided you are using autoconf/automake. Similar options may be available in other build systems.)

This sort of hardcoding is what is used in practice, and it suffices. For a development build within your own working copy, having a hardcoded path should not be a problem, and final builds (those done by a packager) will simply use the standard FHS paths.

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So the project itself stays somewhere in "home/user" until you're ready to "deploy" it to your own machine, then? What about externals and tools that you build from source? These also go under "usr/local", correct? –  harpo Feb 14 '11 at 16:25
    
1. How you run your development process you can choose, though I prefer to run it from within the checkout during code crafting. 2. Build tools are preferably deployed first, but if need be, setting $PATH temporarily should do the job of using a just-built version of a tool. Using non-deployed tools is however an exception rather than a rule. If you rely on too many non-deployed tools, something is wrong with the development model (usually a sign that your project is too big and should perhaps be split). –  user611775 Feb 14 '11 at 22:06

You could just test a few locations. For example, first check if you have a data directory within the directory you're currently running the program from. If so, just go ahead and use it. If not, try /usr/local/share/yourproject/data, and so on.

For developing/testing, you can use the data directory within your project folder, and for deploying, use the stuff in /usr/local/share/. Of course, you can test for even more locations (e.g. /usr/share).

Basically the requirement for this method is that you have a function that builds the correct paths for all filesystem accesses. Instead of fopen("data/blabla.conf", "w") use something like fopen(path("blabla.conf"), "w"). path() will construct the correct path from the path determined using the directory tests when the program started. E.g. if the path was /usr/local/share/yourproject/data/, the string returned by path("blabla.conf") would be "/usr/local/share/yourproject/data/blabla.conf" - and there is your nice absolute path.

That's how I'd do it. HTH.

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My preferred solution in cases like this is to use a configuration file, along with a command-line option that overrides its location.

For example, a configuration file for a fully deployed application named myapp could reside in /etc/myapp/settings.conf and a part of it could look like this:

...
confdir=/etc/myapp/
bindir=/usr/bin/
datadir=/usr/share/myapp/
docdir=/usr/share/doc/myapp/
...

Your application (or a launcher script) can parse this file to determine where to find the rest of the needed files.

I believe that you can reasonably assume in your code that the location of the configuration file is fixed under /etc/myapp - or any other location specified at compile time. Then you provide a command line option to allow that location to be overridden:

myapp --configfile=/opt/myapp/etc/settings.conf ...

It might also make sense to have options for some of the directory paths as well, so that the user can easily override any of the configuration file settings. This approach has a couple of advantages:

  • Your users can relocate the application very easily - just by moving the files, modifying the paths in the configuration file and then using e.g. a wrapper script to call the main application with the proper --configfile option.

  • You can easily support FHS, as well as any other scheme you need to.

  • While developing, you can have your testsuite use a specially crafted configuration file with the paths being wherever you need them to be.

Some people advocate probing the system at runtime to resolve issues like this. I usually suggest avoiding such solutions for at least the following reasons:

  • It makes your program non-deterministic. You can never tell at a first glance which configuration file it picks up - especially if you have multiple versions of the application on your system.

  • At any installation mix-up, the application will remain fat and happy - and so will the user. In my opinion, the application should look at one specific and well-documented location and abort with an informative message if it cannot find what it is looking for.

  • It's highly unlikely that you will always get everything right. There will always be unexpected rare environments or corner cases that the application will not handle.

  • Such behaviour is against the Unix philosophy. Even comamnd shells probe multiple locations because all locations can hold a file that should be parsed.

EDIT:

This method is not mandated by any formal standard that I know of, but it is the prevalent solution in the Unix world. Most major daemons (e.g. BIND, sendmail, postfix, INN, Apache) will look for a configuration file at a certain location, but will allow you to override that location and - through the file - any other path.

This is mostly to allow the system administrator to implement whetever scheme they want or to setup multiple concurrent installations, but it does help during testing as well. This flexibility is what makes it a Best Practice if not a proper standard.

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This seems like the most flexible and least arbitrary solution. One thing that is clear from the various answers, though — there is no one standard way. –  harpo Feb 20 '11 at 4:53
    
@harpo: see my edit... –  thkala Feb 20 '11 at 10:24

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