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Regex is absolutely my weak point and this one has me completely stumped. I am building a fairly basic search functionality and I need to be able to alter my user input based on the following pattern:

Subject:

%22first set%22 %22second set%22-drupal -wordpress

Desired output:

+"first set" +"second set" -drupal -wordpress

I wish I could be more help as I normally like to at least post the solution I have so far, but on this one I'm at a loss.

Any help is appreciated. Thank you.

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1  
It seems your data is URL encoded. If you apply urldecode, you will get "first set" "second set"-drupal -wordpress. Do you have actually a space before -drupal or should this be inserted too? –  Felix Kling Jan 10 '11 at 3:29
    
I can manage the space. The only issue using urldecode is that this going in an sql query and I only want to urldecode double quotes and only if they're in this pattern. –  Greg-J Jan 10 '11 at 3:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
preg_replace('/%22((?:[^%]|%[^2]|%2[^2])*)%22/', '+"$1"', $str);

Explanation: The $1 is a backreference, which references the first ()-section in the regular expression, in this case, ((?:[^%]|%[^2]|%2[^2])*). And the [^%] and the alternations (...|...|...) after it prevents %22 in between from being matched due to greediness. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regular_expression#Lazy_quantification.

I found that technique in a JavaCC example of matching block comments (/* */), and I can't find any other webpages explaining it, so here is a cleaner example: To match a block of text between 12345 12345........12345 with no 12345 in between: /12345([^1]|1[^2]|12[^3]|123[^4]|1234[^5])*12345/

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You rock. Thank you, very much. Any chance you could offer an explanation on the solution? –  Greg-J Jan 10 '11 at 3:37
    
The $1 is a backreference, which references the first ()-section in the regular expression, in this case, ((?:[^%]|%[^2]|%2[^2])*). And the [^%] thing prevents %22 in between from being matched: prevents greedy matching, greediness is explained in en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regular_expression#Lazy_quantification , while the [^%] method is explained in shinkirou.org/blog/2010/12/tricky-regular-expression-problems (first seen in a JavaCC example) –  Ming-Tang Jan 10 '11 at 3:42
    
@SHiNKiROU Explanation to a code given in answer, should be put to answer itsef, not to the comments, where many people may miss it. I wonder, why didn't you edit your own answer, when asked for a clarification, and used tiny comment instead? –  trejder Jun 26 '14 at 19:04

Seems your data is URL encoded. If you apply urldecode, you will get

"first set" "second set" -drupal -wordpress

(I assume you have a space before -drupal).

Now you have to add +. Again, I assume you have to add those before all words that don't have a - and that are not inside quotes:

$str = '"first set" "second set" -drupal -wordpress foo';
echo preg_replace('#( |^)(?!(?:\w+"|-| ))#','\1+', $str));
// prints +"first set" +"second set" -drupal -wordpress +foo

Update: If you cannot use urldecode, you could just use str_replace to replace %22 with ".

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Is this what you're looking for?

<?php
  $input = "%22first set%22 %22second set%22-drupal -wordpress";
  $res = preg_replace( "/\%22(.+?)\%22/","+\"(\\1)\" ", $input);
  print $res;
?>
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Explanation: the \%22 match "%22". The key here is the (.+?) part, which finds the shortest (i.e., "ungreedy") match between the %22s. In the second part, \1 represents the matched value in (.+?). –  phooji Jan 10 '11 at 4:23

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