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I have the following function:

def filetxt():
    word_freq = {}
    lvl1      = []
    lvl2      = []
    total_t   = 0
    users     = 0
    text      = []

    for l in range(0,500):
        # Open File
        if os.path.exists("C:/Twitter/json/user_" + str(l) + ".json") == True:
            with open("C:/Twitter/json/user_" + str(l) + ".json", "r") as f:
                text_f = json.load(f)
                users = users + 1
                for i in range(len(text_f)):
                    text.append(text_f[str(i)]['text'])
                    total_t = total_t + 1
        else:
            pass

    # Filter
    occ = 0
    import string
    for i in range(len(text)):
        s = text[i] # Sample string
        a = re.findall(r'(RT)',s)
        b = re.findall(r'(@)',s)
        occ = len(a) + len(b) + occ
        s = s.encode('utf-8')
        out = s.translate(string.maketrans("",""), string.punctuation)


        # Create Wordlist/Dictionary
        word_list = text[i].lower().split(None)

        for word in word_list:
            word_freq[word] = word_freq.get(word, 0) + 1

        keys = word_freq.keys()

        numbo = range(1,len(keys)+1)
        WList = ', '.join(keys)
        NList = str(numbo).strip('[]')
        WList = WList.split(", ")
        NList = NList.split(", ")
        W2N = dict(zip(WList, NList))

        for k in range (0,len(word_list)):
            word_list[k] = W2N[word_list[k]]
        for i in range (0,len(word_list)-1):
            lvl1.append(word_list[i])
            lvl2.append(word_list[i+1])

I have used the profiler to find that it seems the greatest CPU time is spent on the zip() function and the join and split parts of the code, I'm looking to see if there is any way I have overlooked that I could potentially clean up the code to make it more optimized, since the greatest lag seems to be in how I am working with the dictionaries and the zip() function. Any help would be appreciated thanks!

p.s. The basic purpose of this function is that a I load in files which contain 20 or so tweets in them, so I am most likely going to end up with about 20k - 50k files being sent through this function. The output is that I produce a list of all the distinct words in a tweet, followed by which words linked to what, e.g:

1 "love"
2 "pasa"
3 "mirar"
4 "ants"
5 "kers"
6 "morir"
7 "dreaming"
8 "tan"
9 "rapido"
10 "one"
11 "much"
12 "la"
...
10 1
13 12
1 7
12 2
7 3
2 4
3 11
4 8
11 6
8 9
6 5
9 20
5 8
20 25
8 18
25 9
18 17
9 2
...
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you want something like:

import string
from collections import defaultdict
rng = xrange if xrange else range

def filetxt():
    users     = 0
    total_t   = 0
    occ       = 0

    wordcount = defaultdict(int)
    wordpairs = defaultdict(lambda: defaultdict(int))
    for filenum in rng(500):
        try:
            with open("C:/Twitter/json/user_" + str(filenum) + ".json",'r') as inf:
                users += 1
                tweets = json.load(inf)
                total_t += len(tweets)

                for txt in (r['text'] for r in tweets):
                    occ += txt.count('RT') + txt.count('@')
                    prev = None
                    for word in txt.encode('utf-8').translate(None, string.punctuation).lower().split():
                        wordcount[word] += 1
                        wordpairs[prev][word] += 1
                        prev = word
        except IOError:
            pass
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot I basically took some from you and @milkypostman but if one is looking for a shorter answer to this for some reason I'll mark this as the answer. Additionally the biggest mistake I was making was calling W2N = dict(zip(WList, NList)) which kept making a larger and larger dictionary every loop through and was wasting cpu time. The solution was to then put this outside of the loop. Which resulted in 1000 files which used to take about 5 minutes now takes .59 seconds or so. –  eWizardII Jan 10 '11 at 8:22

I hope you don't mind I took the liberty of modifying your code to something that I would more likely write.

from itertools import izip
def filetxt():
    # keeps track of word count for each word.
    word_freq = {}
    # list of words which we've found
    word_list = []
    # mapping from word -> index in word_list
    word_map  = {}
    lvl1      = []
    lvl2      = []
    total_t   = 0
    users     = 0
    text      = []

    ####### You should replace this with a glob (see: glob module)
    for l in range(0,500):
        # Open File
        try:
            with open("C:/Twitter/json/user_" + str(l) + ".json", "r") as f:
                text_f = json.load(f)
                users = users + 1
                # in this file there are multiple tweets so add the text
                # for each one.
                for t in text_f.itervalues():
                    text.append(t)  ## CHECK THIS
        except IOError:
            pass

    total_t = len(text)
    # Filter
    occ = 0
    import string
    for s in text:
        a = re.findall(r'(RT)',s)
        b = re.findall(r'(@)',s)
        occ += len(a) + len(b)
        s = s.encode('utf-8')
        out = s.translate(string.maketrans("",""), string.punctuation)


        # make a list of words that are in the text s
        words = s.lower().split(None)

        for word in word_list:
            # try/except is quicker when we expect not to miss
            # and it will be rare for us not to have
            # a word in our list already.
            try:
                word_freq[word] += 1
            except KeyError:
                # we've never seen this word before so add it to our list
                word_freq[word] = 1
                word_map[word] = len(word_list)
                word_list.append(word)


        # little trick to get each word and the word that follows
        for curword, nextword in zip(words, words[1:]):
            lvl1.append(word_map[curword])
            lvl2.append(word_map[nextword])

What is is going to do is give you the following. lvl1 will give you a list of numbers corresponding to words in word_list. so word_list[lvl1[0]] will be the first word in the first tweet you processed. lvl2[0] will be index of the word that follows the lvl1[0] so you can say, world_list[lvl2[0]] is the word that follows word_list[lvl1[0]]. This code basically maintains word_map, word_list and word_freq as it builds this.

Please note that the way you were doing this before, specifically the way you were creating W2N will not work properly. Dictionaries do not maintain order. Ordered dictionaries are coming in 3.1 but just forget about it for now. Basically when you were doing word_freq.keys() it was changing every time you added a new word so there was no consistency. See this example,

>>> x = dict()
>>> x[5] = 2
>>> x
{5: 2}
>>> x[1] = 24
>>> x
{1: 24, 5: 2}
>>> x[10] = 14
>>> x
{1: 24, 10: 14, 5: 2}
>>>

So 5 used to be the 2nd one, but now it's the 3rd.

I also updated it to use a 0 index instead of 1 index. I don't know why you were using range(1, len(...)+1) rather than just range(len(...)).

Regardless, you should get away from thinking about for loops in the traditional sense of C/C++/Java where you do loops over numbers. You should consider that unless you need an index number then you don't need it.

Rule of Thumb: if you need an index, you probably need the element at that index and you should be using enumerate anyways. LINK

Hope this helps...

share|improve this answer
    
After reading your discussion about the dictionaries I realized the worst mistake I was making was calling W2N = dict(zip(WList, NList)) multiple times in the loop, so thanks a lot! –  eWizardII Jan 10 '11 at 8:24

A few things. These lines are weird for me when put together:

WList = ', '.join(keys)
<snip>
WList = WList.split(", ")

That should be Wlist = list(keys).

Are you sure you want to optimize this? I mean, is it really so slow that it's worth your time? And finally, a description of what the script should do would be great, instead of letting us decipher it from the code :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll add a description - the issue is I call this function across like 20k - 50k files, each file contains about 20 strings of text or 20 tweets in them. So if I have 1000 files, that takes about 5 minutes to run. –  eWizardII Jan 10 '11 at 4:02

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