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I am looking for an implementation or clear algorithm for getting the prime factorization of N in either python, pseudocode or anything else well-readable. There are a few demands/facts:

  • N is between 1 and ~20 digits
  • No pre-calculated lookup table, memorization is fine though.
  • Need not to be mathematically proven (e.g. could rely on the Goldbach conjecture if needed)
  • Need not to be precise, is allowed to be probabilistic/deterministic if needed

I need a fast prime factorization algorithm, not only for itself, but for usage in many other algorithms like calculating the Euler phi(n).

I have tried other algorithms from Wikipedia and such but either I couldn't understand them (ECM) or I couldn't create a working implementation from the algorithm (Pollard-Brent).

I am really interested in the Pollard-Brent algorithm, so any more information/implementations on it would be really nice.

Thanks!

EDIT

After messing around a little I have created a pretty fast prime/factorization module. It combines an optimized trial division algorithm, the Pollard-Brent algorithm, a miller-rabin primality test and the fastest primesieve I found on the internet. gcd is a regular Euclid's GCD implementation (binary Euclid's GCD is much slower then the regular one).

Bounty

Oh joy, a bounty can be acquired! But how can I win it?

  • Find an optimalization or bug in my module.
  • Provide alternative/better algorithms/implementations.

The answer which is the most complete/constructive gets the bounty.

And finally the module itself:

import random

def primesbelow(N):
    # http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2068372/fastest-way-to-list-all-primes-below-n-in-python/3035188#3035188
    #""" Input N>=6, Returns a list of primes, 2 <= p < N """
    correction = N % 6 > 1
    N = {0:N, 1:N-1, 2:N+4, 3:N+3, 4:N+2, 5:N+1}[N%6]
    sieve = [True] * (N // 3)
    sieve[0] = False
    for i in range(int(N ** .5) // 3 + 1):
        if sieve[i]:
            k = (3 * i + 1) | 1
            sieve[k*k // 3::2*k] = [False] * ((N//6 - (k*k)//6 - 1)//k + 1)
            sieve[(k*k + 4*k - 2*k*(i%2)) // 3::2*k] = [False] * ((N // 6 - (k*k + 4*k - 2*k*(i%2))//6 - 1) // k + 1)
    return [2, 3] + [(3 * i + 1) | 1 for i in range(1, N//3 - correction) if sieve[i]]

smallprimeset = set(primesbelow(100000))
_smallprimeset = 100000
def isprime(n, precision=7):
    # http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miller-Rabin_primality_test#Algorithm_and_running_time
    if n == 1 or n % 2 == 0:
        return False
    elif n < 1:
        raise ValueError("Out of bounds, first argument must be > 0")
    elif n < _smallprimeset:
        return n in smallprimeset


    d = n - 1
    s = 0
    while d % 2 == 0:
        d //= 2
        s += 1

    for repeat in range(precision):
        a = random.randrange(2, n - 2)
        x = pow(a, d, n)

        if x == 1 or x == n - 1: continue

        for r in range(s - 1):
            x = pow(x, 2, n)
            if x == 1: return False
            if x == n - 1: break
        else: return False

    return True

# https://comeoncodeon.wordpress.com/2010/09/18/pollard-rho-brent-integer-factorization/
def pollard_brent(n):
    if n % 2 == 0: return 2
    if n % 3 == 0: return 3

    y, c, m = random.randint(1, n-1), random.randint(1, n-1), random.randint(1, n-1)
    g, r, q = 1, 1, 1
    while g == 1:
        x = y
        for i in range(r):
            y = (pow(y, 2, n) + c) % n

        k = 0
        while k < r and g==1:
            ys = y
            for i in range(min(m, r-k)):
                y = (pow(y, 2, n) + c) % n
                q = q * abs(x-y) % n
            g = gcd(q, n)
            k += m
        r *= 2
    if g == n:
        while True:
            ys = (pow(ys, 2, n) + c) % n
            g = gcd(abs(x - ys), n)
            if g > 1:
                break

    return g

smallprimes = primesbelow(1000) # might seem low, but 1000*1000 = 1000000, so this will fully factor every composite < 1000000
def primefactors(n, sort=False):
    factors = []

    limit = int(n ** .5) + 1
    for checker in smallprimes:
        if checker > limit: break
        while n % checker == 0:
            factors.append(checker)
            n //= checker
            limit = int(n ** .5) + 1
            if checker > limit: break

    if n < 2: return factors

    while n > 1:
        if isprime(n):
            factors.append(n)
            break
        factor = pollard_brent(n) # trial division did not fully factor, switch to pollard-brent
        factors.extend(primefactors(factor)) # recurse to factor the not necessarily prime factor returned by pollard-brent
        n //= factor

    if sort: factors.sort()

    return factors

def factorization(n):
    factors = {}
    for p1 in primefactors(n):
        try:
            factors[p1] += 1
        except KeyError:
            factors[p1] = 1
    return factors

totients = {}
def totient(n):
    if n == 0: return 1

    try: return totients[n]
    except KeyError: pass

    tot = 1
    for p, exp in factorization(n).items():
        tot *= (p - 1)  *  p ** (exp - 1)

    totients[n] = tot
    return tot

def gcd(a, b):
    if a == b: return a
    while b > 0: a, b = b, a % b
    return a

def lcm(a, b):
    return abs(a * b) // gcd(a, b)
share|improve this question
1  
@wheaties - that would be what the while checker*checker <= num is there for. –  Amber Jan 10 '11 at 4:30
    
You might find this thread useful: stackoverflow.com/questions/1024640/calculating-phik-for-1kn/… –  RBarryYoung Jan 18 '11 at 5:51
    
Why aren't things like this available in the standard library? When I search, all I find is a million Project Euler solution proposals, and other people pointing out flaws in them. Isn't this what libraries and bug reports are for? –  endolith Sep 30 '13 at 23:15
    
@endolith Outside of things like Prject Euler there aren't much uses for this. Certainly not enough to put it in the standard libraries. –  nightcracker Oct 1 '13 at 1:19
    
@nightcracker: There's no practical use for factoring numbers?? –  endolith Oct 1 '13 at 1:20
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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Pollard-Brent in implemented in Python:

https://comeoncodeon.wordpress.com/2010/09/18/pollard-rho-brent-integer-factorization/

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, I already found that one. It returns a random factor of N you pass it. I'm not sure how to make a prime factorization algorithm out of that. –  nightcracker Jan 10 '11 at 4:33
3  
Well, you can recursively call it on the factors it returns until it returns 1 as a factor. –  Amber Jan 10 '11 at 4:35
2  
After messing with it a little, would it hurt to throw in a miller-rabin prime check before calling brent? Because if I call brent on a 11 digit prime number it's busy for 1.3 seconds. –  nightcracker Jan 10 '11 at 4:39
    
Could you please improve this post a bit so it's not just a link? –  ThiefMaster May 5 at 8:04
    
@ThiefMaster In this case, no, I can't. I have no desire to copy-paste wholesale someone else's code into an answer on this site, and there's nothing really to elaborate on here beyond that. If someone else wants to write a more in-depth answer that isn't just a straight-up copy, that's their prerogative. –  Amber May 5 at 18:15
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There is no need to calculate smallprimes using primesbelow, use smallprimeset for that.

smallprimes = (2,) + tuple(n for n in xrange(3,1000,2) if n in smallprimeset)

Divide your primefactors into two functions for handling smallprimes and other for pollard_brent, this can save a couple of iterations as all the powers of smallprimes will be divided from n.

def primefactors(n, sort=False):
    factors = []

    limit = int(n ** .5) + 1
    for checker in smallprimes:
        print smallprimes[-1]
        if checker > limit: break
        while n % checker == 0:
            factors.append(checker)
            n //= checker


    if n < 2: return factors
    else : 
        factors.extend(bigfactors(n,sort))
        return factors

def bigfactors(n, sort = False):
    factors = []
    while n > 1:
        if isprime(n):
            factors.append(n)
            break
        factor = pollard_brent(n) 
        factors.extend(bigfactors(factor,sort)) # recurse to factor the not necessarily prime factor returned by pollard-brent
        n //= factor

    if sort: factors.sort()    
    return factors

By considering verified results of Pomerance, Selfridge and Wagstaff and Jaeschke, you can reduce the repetitions in isprime which uses Miller-Rabin primality test. From Wiki.

  • if n < 1,373,653, it is enough to test a = 2 and 3;
  • if n < 9,080,191, it is enough to test a = 31 and 73;
  • if n < 4,759,123,141, it is enough to test a = 2, 7, and 61;
  • if n < 2,152,302,898,747, it is enough to test a = 2, 3, 5, 7, and 11;
  • if n < 3,474,749,660,383, it is enough to test a = 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, and 13;
  • if n < 341,550,071,728,321, it is enough to test a = 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, and 17.

Edit 1: Corrected return call of if-else to append bigfactors to factors in primefactors.

share|improve this answer
    
Enjoy your +100 (you're the only one who answered since the bounty). Your bigfactors is horribly inefficient though, because factors.extend(bigfactors(factor)) recurses back to bigfactors which is just plain wrong (what if pollard-brent finds the factor 234892, you don't want to factorize that with pollard-brent again). If you change factors.extend(bigfactors(factor)) to factors.extend(primefactors(factor, sort)) then it's fine. –  nightcracker Jan 19 '11 at 21:22
    
One primefactors calls bigfactors then its clear that there is will no power of small prime in the next factors obtained by pollard-brent. –  Rozuur Jan 20 '11 at 4:28
    
If its inefficient I would not have answered this. Once call goes from primefactors to bigfactors there will be no factor in n which is lessthan 1000 hence pollard-brent cannot return a number whose factors will be lessthan 1000. If its not clear, reply such that i will edit my answer with more explanations –  Rozuur Jan 20 '11 at 5:05
    
Shit NVM, ofcourse. If N doesn't contain any factors found by smallprimes then factor F of N won't either >.< –  nightcracker Jan 20 '11 at 16:10
    
Also you should use smallprimeset instead of smallprime and remove smallprimeset from miller-rabin. –  Rozuur Jan 20 '11 at 16:40
show 4 more comments

Even on the current one, there are several spots to be noticed.

  1. Don't do checker*checker every loop, use s=ceil(sqrt(num)) and checher < s
  2. checher should plus 2 each time, ignore all even numbers except 2
  3. Use divmod instead of % and //
share|improve this answer
    
I need to do checker*checker because num decreases constantly. I'll implement the even numbers skip though. The divmod decreases the function a lot (it will calculate the // on every loop, instead of only when checker divides n). –  nightcracker Jan 10 '11 at 4:40
    
@night, you just need to recalcuate s whenever you alter num then –  gnibbler Jan 10 '11 at 4:55
    
True, figured that while messing around :) Seems to be faster to recalculate sqrt then checker*checker. –  nightcracker Jan 10 '11 at 5:05
    
@nightcracker: Let N=n*n+1, ceil(sqrt(N)) cost about 2~4 times than n*n, num does not change that frequently. –  Kabie Jan 10 '11 at 5:11
    
Do you know of an ceil/floor sqrt algorithm, because int(num ** .5) + 1 seems to be overkill (first calculate in float precision and then chop off). –  nightcracker Jan 10 '11 at 5:15
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You should probably do some prime detection which you could look here, Fast algorithm for finding prime numbers?

You should read that entire blog though, there is a few algorithms that he lists for testing primality.

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There's a python library with a collection of primality tests (including incorrect ones for what not to do). It's called pyprimes. Figured it's worth mentioning for posterity's purpose. I don't think it includes the algorithms you mentioned.

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