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I have the id which is the primary. It has auto increment.

When ever I try to enter a default value like for example: 000 - it does not start counting from that number but from 0,1,2,3 etc...

how can i make it 000?

Or in my case I really want it for a invoice - say 2011-000 and start counting can it be possible??

any ideas??

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3 Answers 3

For making your column to contain 000, you will need to make it zerofill. So, Alter your table with zerofill option for your column.

You can read more about zerofill ,

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/numeric-type-overview.html

Also, as ajreal suggested, you will need to physically update column to zero.

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I think is 50% correct (zerofill is correct) –  ajreal Jan 10 '11 at 5:28
    
@ajreal: Thanks, can you tell me about my mistake above so that i can take care of it in future. This will be new learning for me. –  Nik Jan 10 '11 at 5:30
    
I don't think able to set auto_increment to zero (unless you physically update it to zero) –  ajreal Jan 10 '11 at 5:35
    
@ajreal: Thanks. I will update my answer. –  Nik Jan 10 '11 at 5:39
ALTER TABLE tablename AUTO_INCREMENT = 1
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Why you need to bother between 0000 and 0001 ?

PS - http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/server-sql-mode.html#sqlmode_no_auto_value_on_zero

NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO affects handling of AUTO_INCREMENT columns. Normally, you generate the next sequence number for the column by inserting either NULL or 0 into it. NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO suppresses this behavior for 0 so that only NULL generates the next sequence number.

This mode can be useful if 0 has been stored in a table's AUTO_INCREMENT column. (Storing 0 is not a recommended practice, by the way.) For example, if you dump the table with mysqldump and then reload it, MySQL normally generates new sequence numbers when it encounters the 0 values, resulting in a table with contents different from the one that was dumped. Enabling NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO before reloading the dump file solves this problem. mysqldump now automatically includes in its output a statement that enables NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO, to avoid this problem.

Hope the following make sense without change NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO ...

mysql> create table invoice (years int(4) unsigned, 
seq int(4) unsigned zerofill not null auto_increment, 
primary key(years, seq));
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.01 sec)

mysql> insert into invoice values (2011, 0);
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> update invoice set seq=0;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)
Rows matched: 1  Changed: 1  Warnings: 0

mysql> alter table invoice auto_increment=0;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)
Records: 1  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> insert into invoice values (2011, 0);
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from invoice;
+-------+------+
| years | seq  |
+-------+------+
|  2011 | 0000 |
|  2011 | 0001 |
+-------+------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> insert into invoice values (2011, 0), (2011, 0);
Query OK, 2 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Records: 2  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> select * from invoice;
+-------+------+
| years | seq  |
+-------+------+
|  2011 | 0000 |
|  2011 | 0001 |
|  2011 | 0002 |
|  2011 | 0003 |
+-------+------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)
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