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Hi I am new to git, I usually use P4 which has center repository, while git is distributed VCS.

I am interesting in how git works when two peers push changes to same remote simultaneously? Assume each peer resolved all conflicts before push. I guess the later one will be rejected if git reports conflicts!

However, from what i understand, git is internally a key/value store, much like the current popular NOSQL database especially Couch-DB which supports p2p replication.

Actually I want to ask, how does git process conflicts in the case that clients push changes to remote git repository. Is the push rejected?

from the mark's answer, I think the push should be rejected.

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3  
The big point here is that it's impossible for two people to push completely simultaneously. One of them "gets there first", as Mark says, and a split-second is as good as an hour. The real question is: "what if one person pushes, then another pushes something different?" Mark has answered this for you as well. –  Jefromi Jan 10 '11 at 15:58
    
To understand how Git works under the hood, I recommend reading ftp.newartisans.com/pub/git.from.bottom.up.pdf –  Rolf May 1 '13 at 11:07

1 Answer 1

Update: git isn't like a key-value store internally, I'm afraid - thinking of it in those terms will be confusing and unhelpful. Yes, one of the pushes will be rejected - whichever one is just later, as Jefromi mentions in his comment. However, it will be rejected because the remote repository sees that the history of the later push doesn't include the history of the earlier one, rather than because it sees any conflict in the content that's being pushed. My original answer, below, goes into how this works in more detail.

Usually a push will be rejected if it wouldn't "fast-forward" the branch, in git terminology. This means that if your master is at A and the remote repository's is at B, then the push will only succeed if B is an ancestor of A. (I say "usually" because you can add options to "force" the push if the remote repository allows that, but that's not the typical case.)

In the case you describe, supposing all three repositories initially have the same history:

P -- Q -- R

And you have added a commit S:

P -- Q -- R -- S

... while someone else has added a commit T:

P -- Q -- R -- T

If that other person gets there first, then their push will be accepted because R is an ancestor of T, so the remote repository will then also have the history P -- Q -- R -- T. If you subsequently try to push, you will get an error because T is not an ancestor of S. Typically, on seeing that ! [rejected] error you will either run git pull or git pull --rebase to make sure that you are ahead of master in the remote repository.

git pull will create a merge commit M to make your history look like:

P -- Q -- R -- T -- M
           \       /
            -- S -

... while git pull --rebase will reapply the changes that you introduced on top of T to create a new commit, S':

P -- Q -- R -- T -- S'

In either of those cases, you should be able to push again, because T is an ancestor of both M and S'. (That is assuming no one else has pushed again in the mean time!)

By only allowing fast-forwards there never has to be resolution of conflicts on the remote side - if there are any conflicts, you'll be prompted to resolve them locally when you run git pull.

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+1; nice and comprehensive. –  Jefromi Jan 10 '11 at 16:00
    
I don't understand it clearly since there are some terms that I don't know about git.I need more time to learn git for understand your answers. However, from what i understand, git is internally a key/value store, much like the current popular NOSQL database especially Couch-DB which supports p2p replication. Actually I want to ask, how does git process conflicts in the case that clients push changes to remote git repository. Is the push rejected? from the mark's answer, I think the push should be rejected. –  Chang Jan 13 '11 at 5:26
1  
@Chang, all the conflicts should be resolved at local site. If server detects a conflict when someone pushes data (and if two users are doing this "simultaneously" one of the pushes will be conflicting, because it will be applied only after the other one completes), the server will reject it, and the unlucky user shall then resolve conflicts and try to push again. –  Pavel Shved Jan 13 '11 at 5:38
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@Chang: I'm afraid git really isn't like a key/value store, and it'll just be confusing to think of it in those terms. Perhaps the central idea is what a "commit" is (e.g. P, Q, etc. in my answer): a commit records the exact content of the source code at that point in time with the date, author's name, and references to parent commits. Those parent commits let you construct the history of the project up to that point. The later push won't be rejected because of conflicts - it'll be rejected because the history of the commit you're pushing doesn't include the commit in the earlier one. –  Mark Longair Jan 13 '11 at 8:55
    
This. Seriously, git isn't anything like a key-value store and, as Mark said, thinking of it in those terms will only bring you further confusion. –  James Gregory Jan 13 '11 at 9:34

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