Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using git as a frontend to Subversion (via git svn).

So, for every svn trunk/branch I have remote branch in git named "remotes/xxx". For example "remotes/trunk", "remotes/coolfeature".

Now I want have one "default" local branch for every remote branch, to use it for dcommit. The problem is that I want such branches to be named after Subversion branches, like "trunk", "coolfeature", so I have the following branches in git:

trunk
coolfeature
remotes/trunk
remotes/coolfeature

The problem is that every time I reference "trunk" or "coolfeature" git complains branch name is ambiguous. Not a big deal, but I feel uncomfortable.

The question is, how can I deal with that warning, assuming that simply renaming branches is not what I want to do. What are the best practices for such cases?

share|improve this question
3  
I'm not sure. I avoided this by just choosing different but similar names. However, you could try using refs/heads/trunk or maybe even just heads/trunk. I think that should work. –  MatrixFrog Jan 10 '11 at 7:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 37 down vote accepted

If you pass the --prefix=svn/ flag to the git svn clone command, then all of the Subversion branches would be named like remotes/svn/branchname. If this is acceptable to you, it fixes the "refname is ambiguous" warning. It also gives you a nice way of referring to the remote svn branches, as in for instance if you want to create a local tracking branch it would be something like:

$ git checkout -b branchname svn/branchname

The local branch then has the same name as the remote svn branch, and no ambiguous refname problem.

share|improve this answer
17  
How can I fix a repository I already cloned to have --prefix=svn/? –  Elazar Leibovich Mar 29 '11 at 11:54
    
I just cloned into a new directory and then fetched the local branches I had from the other directory: git fetch ../other_dir branch_name:branch_name --- tab completion is great for the branch names too. –  EnigmaCurry Sep 21 '11 at 19:07
    
If you have already created a branch with the same name, you can rename your branch with this command: git branch -m [currentName] [newName] –  MikeD Mar 10 at 18:27

If you just want to get rid of warning, set core.warnAmbiguousRefs to false:

git config --global core.warnambiguousrefs false

If you want this behavior only for single repository, omit --global flag.

share|improve this answer
    
I probably violated all all known/unknown rules here, but I tried "git tag -a HEAD -m 'Start of repo'" on a new repo, after which I received the OPs error message. The fix described in this post allowed me to keep working. –  bakoyaro Mar 25 '13 at 12:16

It can be possible that you have another 'trunk' and 'coolfeature' as a tag. In this case, git doesn't know if you refer to branch or tag. Rename the tags and check if git doesn't report "ambiguous" name

share|improve this answer

To avoid the conflict messages, when referring to local branches, prefix them with head/

for example, the conflicting branch topic

$ git diff topic remotes/topic
warning: reframe 'topic' is ambiguous.
...

becomes

$ git diff heads/topic remotes/topic
...
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.