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I tried to read many articles on dofactory, wikipedia and many sites. I have no idea what the difference is between them.

I know both of them decouple an abstraction from its implementation and can change implementation at run time.

But I still don't know in which situation I should use strategy or in which situation I should use bridge.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Semantics. From wikipedia:

The UML class diagram for the Strategy pattern is the same as the diagram for the Bridge pattern. However, these two design patterns aren't the same in their intent. While the Strategy pattern is meant for behavior, the Bridge pattern is meant for structure.

The coupling between the context and the strategies is tighter than the coupling between the abstraction and the implementation in the Bridge pattern.

As I understand it, you're using the strategy pattern when you're abstracting behavior that could be provided from an external source (eg. config could specify to load some plugin assembly), and you're using the bridge pattern when you use the same constructs to make your code a bit neater. The actual code will look very similar - you're just applying the patterns for slightly different reasons.

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so can I say that I am using the strategy pattern to be able to abstract behavior while also making the code look neater like in the bridge pattern.. or, I am using the Bridge pattern to make the code neater and also because it allows me to abstract behavior like in the strategy pattern? and would I be right? –  user20358 Feb 8 '12 at 15:58
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The Bridge pattern is a structural pattern (HOW DO YOU BUILD A SOFTWARE COMPONENT?). The Strategy pattern is a dynamic pattern (HOW DO YOU WANT RUN A BEHAVIOUR IN SOFTWARE?).

The syntax is similar but the goal are differents:

  • Strategy: you have more ways for doing an operation; with strategy you can choice the algorithm at run-time and you can modify a single Strategy without a lot of side-effects at compile-time;
  • Bridge: you can split the hierarchy of interface and class join him with an abstract reference (see explication)
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so if the syntax is similar would I be correct in saying that I am using either of those patterns to run a software behavior a particular way and also because I want to build the component in that fashion so it looks neat as well? –  user20358 Feb 8 '12 at 15:55
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Strategy:

  • Context tied to the Strategy: The context Class (possibly Abstract but not really an interface! as u wish to encapsulate out a specific behavior and not the entire implementation) would know/contain the strategy interface reference and the implementation to invoke the strategy behavior on it.
  • Intent is ability to swap behavior at runtime

    class Context {
    
         IStrategy strategyReference;
    
         void strategicBehaviour() {
    
            strategyReference.behave();
         }
    
    }
    

Bridge

  • Abstraction not tied to the Implementation: The abstraction interface (or abstract class with most of the behavior abstract) would not know/contain the implementation interface reference
  • Intent is to completely decouple the Abstraction from the Implementation

    interface IAbstraction {
    
        void behaviour1();
    
        .....
    
    }
    
    interface IImplementation {
    
         void behave1();
    
         void behave2();
    
         .....
    
    }
    
    class ConcreteAbstraction1 implements IAbstraction {
    
          IImplementation implmentReference;
    
          ConcreteAbstraction1() {
    
               implmentReference = new ImplementationA() // Some implementation
    
          }
    
          void behaviour1() {
    
                implmentReference.behave1();
    
          }
    
          .............
    
    }
    
    class ConcreteAbstraction2 implements IAbstraction {
    
          IImplementation implmentReference;
    
          ConcreteAbstraction1() {
    
               implmentReference = new ImplementationB() // Some Other implementation
    
          }
    
          void behaviour1() {
    
                implmentReference.behave2();
    
          }
    
          .............
    
    }
    
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From the wiki on Strategy pattern

The UML class diagram for the Strategy pattern is the same as the diagram for the Bridge pattern. However, these two design patterns aren't the same in their intent. While the Strategy pattern is meant for behavior, the Bridge pattern is meant for structure.

The coupling between the context and the strategies is tighter than the coupling between the abstraction and the implementation in the Bridge pattern.

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I hear an echo ;p –  johnc Jan 21 '09 at 11:23
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Adding to willcodejavaforfood's answer, they can be the same, in implementation. However you use strategy to swap strategies such as sorting strategy, while you use bridge to bridge the implementations of two object's say a database wrapper, and a network adaptor so the client code can use either working against the same API. So the naming actually says it all

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Just to add to what has already been said about the pattern comparison (difference of intent, ...): the Bridge pattern is also intentionally structured to allow the abstraction hierarchy side to vary. In languages like C# this could imply you have an abstraction base that contains virtual methods as a way to allow intended variations that don't cause problems for existing consumers. Other than that the two patterns might appear identical for the most part.

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Strategy pattern is used when you wish to plug algorithm or strategy at run time. As category of pattern also implies that it deals with behaviour of the objects. On the other hand bridge is structural pattern and deals with structural hierarchy of the objects. It decouples the abstraction from implementation by introducing a refined abstraction between them. Refined abstraction can be confused with the run time strategy plugged (In Strategy pattern). Bridge pattern deals with the structural aspects by providing a mechanism to avoid creating n number of classes.

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