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assume we have an enum that has FlagsAttribute.

[Flags]
enum CarOptions
{
  Sunroof = 1,
  Spoiler = 2,
  TintedWindow = 4
}

this could be used easily. now assume this one

[Flags]
enum CarOptions
{
  SunroofElectrical,
  SunroofMechanical,
  Spoiler,
  TintedWindowBlack,
  TintedWindowPurple
}

of course this is syntactically incorrect. but a Car can't have Mechanical and Electrical Sunroof at the same time or having Black and Purple TintedWindow both.
The question is: Is there a mechanism to implement the Flags enumeration which cannot have some attributes simultaneously?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no built-in mechanism for this. Flag-enumerations allow any combination of the members to be combined. You will need to perform manual validation in such a scenario or create a model that does not accept invalid options. There are other options but the preferred approach I would choose is similar to this:

class CarOptions
{
    public SunroofKind Sunroof { get; set; }
    public SpoilerKind Spoiler { get; set; }
    public TintedWindowKind TintedWindow { get; set; }
    // Note that I split this into two enums - the kind of tinted window
    // (UV-resistant option too maybe?) and color might be different.
    // This is just an example of how such option composition can be done.
    public TintedWindowColor TintedWindowColor { get; set; }

    // In this class, you can also implement additional logic, such as
    // "cannot have spoiler on diesel engine models" and whatever may be required.
}

enum SunroofKind
{
    None,
    Electrical,
    Mechanical
}

enum SpoilerKind
{
    None,
    Standard
}

enum TintedWindowKind
{
    None,
    Standard
}

enum TintedWindowColor
{
    Black,
    Blue
}

As you see, I got rid of the original enumeration altogether. I do not see any reason to use such a construct in this scenario - combinations of different variables that also need domain-specific combination logic applied are not good candidates for flag-enumerations. The options and logic should be encapsulated in a class (or possibly a struct, depending on how it is meant to be used).

Flag-enumerations are only useful for very simple and/or specialized cases.

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I guess you would do this by using different enums for Sunroofs and TindedWindows.

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You have two options, as I see it:

1) Don't use an enum. Use another mechanism for setting options that come in combinations that conflict with one another.

2) Define invalid combinations and Check for them when setting flags:

[flags]
enum CarOptions
{
  SunroofElectrical = 1,
  SunroofMechanical = 2,
  Spoiler           = 4,
  TintedWindowBlack = 8,
  TintedWindowPurple= 16,
  // bad combos
  BadSunroof        = 3,
  BadWindowColor    = 24
}

CarOptions opt = CarOptions.SunroofElectrical | CarOptions.SunroofMechanical;
if(opt & BadSunroof)
{
}
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1  
Yeah but CarOptions suggest that you can combine all of the attributes. Don't create constructs like that, where semantics require additional EXTERNAL logic. When new enum values appear, you would have to examine all "if-logic" around whole application and possibly add new dependencies. Bad concept. –  dzendras Jan 10 '11 at 10:33
    
@dzendras, hence the first solution was simply not to use enums. –  Moo-Juice Jan 10 '11 at 10:34
    
You can use enums, but separate them as sprinter252 showed. –  dzendras Jan 10 '11 at 10:35
    
@dzendras, how would having a separate enum for sunroofs help? That just puts the sunroofs together, and doesn't stop me combining two different kinds of sunroof. EDIT: Oh I see... the new enums would not be flags. –  Moo-Juice Jan 10 '11 at 10:39
    
That's right :) –  dzendras Jan 10 '11 at 10:48

You could use one bit of the flags to indicate a particular feature being present, and another to indicate the "flavour" of the feature:

[Flags]
enum CarOptions
{
  Sunroof = 1,
  SunroofElectrical = 1,
  SunroofMechanical = 3,
  Spoiler = 4,
  TintedWindow = 8,
  TintedWindowBlack = 8,
  TintedWindowPurple = 24
}

It's then impossible to have both "flavours" together.

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Not really. It only provides a default, not exclusivity: var x = CarOptions.SunroofMechanical; if (x.HasFlag(CarOptions.SunroofElectrical)) Console.WriteLine("Has electrical sunroof"); –  LukeH Jan 10 '11 at 10:44
    
How does C# handle converting int to such an enum where int has value of 8? –  dzendras Jan 10 '11 at 10:45
    
@LukeH - true, I was more thinking of setting the flags, rather than testing them. You'd have to structure your tests to test for the "non-default" flavours first. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 10 '11 at 10:49
    
@dzendras - not sure what you're asking. You can have as many names in an enum as you like with the same numerical value, and the numerical value is the "real" value of the enum at any time (in fact, enum variables can contain values which aren't defined in the enum at all) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 10 '11 at 10:50

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