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How would do the following in SQL

"select dept names who have more than 2 employees whose salary is greater than 1000" ?

DeptId DeptName
------ --------
1          one
2          two
3        three

EmpId DeptId Salary
----- ------ ------
121      1    2000
122      1    2000
123      1    5000
124      1    4000
131      2    2000
132      2    6000
133      2    1000
134      2    1000
125      3    1000
126      3   20000


RESULT: one
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1st table name = DEPARTMENT; 2nd table name = EMPLOYEE; –  Anshul Jan 10 '11 at 11:08
1  
Why does employee #121 have three salaries - one in dept 1 and 2 in dept 3? –  Larry Lustig Jan 10 '11 at 14:48
    
Larry I have removed the discrepancy from the Question. –  Anshul Jan 11 '11 at 10:09
    
why this question down voted? –  vikam tyagi May 18 '13 at 7:03
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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

How about something like this?

SELECT D.DeptName FROM
Department D WHERE (SELECT COUNT(*) 
                    FROM Employee E 
                    WHERE E.DeptID = D.DeptID AND
                            E.Salary > 1000) > 2
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This worked as expected and to me it seems to be the best answer. Please let me know if anyone differs. –  Anshul Jan 11 '11 at 10:13
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SELECT DEPTNAME
FROM(SELECT D.DEPTNAME,COUNT(EMPID) AS TOTEMP
     FROM DEPT AS D,EMPLOYEE AS E
     WHERE D.DEPTID=E.DEPTID AND SALARY>1000
     GROUP BY D.DEPTID
     )
WHERE TOTEMP>2;
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select min(DEPARTMENT.DeptName) as deptname 
from DEPARTMENT
inner join employee on
DEPARTMENT.DeptId = employee.DeptId
where Salary > 1000
group by (EmpId) having count(EmpId) > =2 
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Pankaj this didn't work. I would be thankful if you post the corrected solution. I would learn. –  Anshul Jan 11 '11 at 10:13
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hope this helps

select DeptName from DEPARTMENT inner join EMPLOYEE using (DeptId) where Salary>1000 group by DeptName having count(*)>2
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select deptname from dept_1
where exists
(
SELECT DeptId,COUNT(*)        
FROM emp_1  
where salary>1000
and emp_1.deptid=dept_1.deptid   
GROUP BY DeptId 
having count(*)>2)
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Welcome on SO, here, it is a good practice to explain why to use your solution and not just how. That will make your answer more valuable and help further reader to have a better understanding of how you do it. I also suggest that you have a look on our FAQ : stackoverflow.com/faq. –  ForceMagic Nov 12 '12 at 1:36
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My main advice would be to steer clear of the HAVING clause. The following is long winded but hopefully you will note the intervening steps (Standard SQL-99 syntax, works on SQL Server:

Targeting base tables:

WITH HighEarners (EmpId, DeptId)
     AS
     (
      SELECT EmpId, DeptId
        FROM EMPLOYEE
       WHERE Salary > 1000
     ), 
     DeptmentHighEarnerTallies (DeptId, high_earner_tally)
     AS
     (
      SELECT DeptId, COUNT(*)
        FROM HighEarners
       GROUP 
          BY DeptId
     )
SELECT D1.DeptName
  FROM DEPARTMENT AS D1
       INNER JOIN DeptmentHighEarnerTallies AS T1
          ON D1.DeptId = T1.DeptId
 WHERE high_earner_tally > 2;

Including test data:

WITH DEPARTMENT (DeptId, DeptName)
     AS
     (
      SELECT DeptId, DeptName
        FROM (
              VALUES (1, 'one'), 
                     (2, 'two'), 
                     (3, 'three')
             ) AS DEPARTMENT (DeptId, DeptName)
     ), 
     EMPLOYEE (EmpId, DeptId, Salary)
     AS
     (
      SELECT EmpId, DeptId, Salary
        FROM (
              VALUES (121, 1, 2000), 
                     (122, 1, 2000), 
                     (123, 1, 5000), 
                     (124, 1, 4000), 
                     (131, 2, 2000), 
                     (132, 2, 6000), 
                     (133, 2, 1000), 
                     (134, 2, 1000), 
                     (121, 3, 1000), 
                     (121, 3, 20000)
             ) AS EMPLOYEE (EmpId, DeptId, Salary)
     ), 
     HighEarners (EmpId, DeptId)
     AS
     (
      SELECT EmpId, DeptId
        FROM EMPLOYEE
       WHERE Salary > 1000
     ), 
     DeptmentHighEarnerTallies (DeptId, high_earner_tally)
     AS
     (
      SELECT DeptId, COUNT(*)
        FROM HighEarners
       GROUP 
          BY DeptId
     )
SELECT D1.DeptName
  FROM DEPARTMENT AS D1
       INNER JOIN DeptmentHighEarnerTallies AS T1
          ON D1.DeptId = T1.DeptId
 WHERE high_earner_tally > 2;
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1  
On what do you base your advice to steer clear of "HAVING" - an operator that seems designed specifically to answer the OP's question in a clear and easy fashion? –  Larry Lustig Jan 10 '11 at 14:47
    
    
@Larry Lustig: For the full gory details see "HAVING A Blunderful Time or Wish You Were WHERE" by Hugh Darwen (dcs.warwick.ac.uk/~hugh/TTM/HAVING-A-Blunderful-Time.html) –  onedaywhen Jan 10 '11 at 15:22
1  
That article contains a very idiosyncratic view of HAVING. The argument against it is pretty lame (that people have to learn the difference between operating on the candidate rows and the aggregated result set). Can you possibly argue that the solution you gave is superior Pankaj's? –  Larry Lustig Jan 10 '11 at 15:30
    
@Larry Lustig: "idiosyncratic", "pretty lame", "superior": such things are subjective, you are entitled to hold a differing opinion, there is no 'proof' I can offer you. However, my experince of learning and teaching SQL is the same as Darwen's. I wager most SQL learners find HAVING unintuitive and clunky and things pan out something like this: one has mastered SELECT..FROM..JOIN..WHERE OK. Then comes GROUP BY ("WTF?") followed swiftly by HAVING ("I can't just put it in the WHERE clause? WTF?!") I suspect you are only 'cool' with HAVING because you've grown used to it ove time :) –  onedaywhen Jan 11 '11 at 9:05
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