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Ive been trying to change my method to a void. But whenever I change it, it always prints out the book name and an error message. How can I change my method to a void?

public int displayBookDetails(String bookName) {
  for (int i = 0; i < classrooms.size(); i++) {
    Library library = librarys.get(i);
    if (library.returnBookName().equals(bookName)) {
      System.out.println("Index: " + i);   
      System.out.println(library.returnBookName());
      System.out.println(library.authorName());           
      return i;
    }
  }
  return -1;
  System.out.println ("Book name is not valid"); 
}
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3  
Your code does not compile - you must not have any statements in a method after a return. What do you want to accomplish? Do you want to change the method signature return type to void? Then you must not use return. –  sleske Jan 10 '11 at 11:27
    
Or do you mean the System.out.println() method? –  Tobiask Jan 10 '11 at 11:37

5 Answers 5

You need to remove the return statements (and replace the first one by a simple return (no parameter)) too.

public void displayBookDetails(String bookName) {
  for (int i = 0; i < classrooms.size(); i++) {
    Library library = librarys.get(i);
    if (library.returnBookName().equals(bookName)) {
        System.out.println("Index: " + i);   
        System.out.println(library.returnBookName());
        System.out.println(library.authorName());           
        //removed  return i;
        return;
    }
  }

  // removed return -1;
  System.out.println ("Book name is not valid"); 
}
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This will print the book name and the warning like the OP mentioned. –  rsp Jan 10 '11 at 11:27
    
@rsp: opps, -- already corrected –  Ralph Jan 10 '11 at 11:28

Try something like this, I am sure it will work:

public void displayBookDetails(String bookName) {
  for (int i = 0; i < classrooms.size(); i++) {
    Library library = librarys.get(i);
    if (library.returnBookName().equals(bookName)) {
        System.out.println("Index: " + i);   
        System.out.println(library.returnBookName());
        System.out.println(library.authorName());           
        return; // modified here
    }
  }
  // modified here
  System.out.println ("Book name is not valid"); 
}
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You probably still want to return when you've found the book - that may be what you've missed before:

public void displayBookDetails(String bookName) {
  for (int i = 0; i < classrooms.size(); i++) {
    Library library = librarys.get(i);
    if (library.returnBookName().equals(bookName)) {
      System.out.println("Index: " + i);   
      System.out.println(library.returnBookName());
      System.out.println(library.authorName());           
      return;
    }
  }
  System.out.println ("Book name is not valid"); 
}

Personally I'd probably separate out the "search" from "display":

public Library getBookDetails(String bookName) {
  for (int i = 0; i < classrooms.size(); i++) {
    Library library = librarys.get(i);
    if (library.returnBookName().equals(bookName)) {
       return library;
    }
  }
  return null;
}

public void displayBookDetails(String bookName) {
  Library bookDetails = getBookDetails(bookName);
  if (bookDetails == null) {
    System.out.println ("Book name is not valid"); 
  } else {
    System.out.println(bookDetails.returnBookName());
    System.out.println(bookDetails.authorName());           
  }
}

(Note that there's no such thing as the "index" at this point, of course. If you really need to display that as well, it would need to be part of Library.)

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You can do so by using return without a value:

    System.out.println(library.authorName());           
    return;
}
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The return type you are trying to change to void only signifies what is returned by the method. However the method might have different side-effects like I/O, e.g. printing to the console. Unfortunately there is no way to constrain side-effects in Java or most OOP langauges. Functional programming aims at getting rid of all side effects in your functions, so it can be reasoned about the program more easily.

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