Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following program gives output as

 I am Parameterized Ctor
 a = 0
 b = 0

public class ParameterizedCtor {

    private int a;
    private int b;

    public ParameterizedCtor() {
        System.out.println("I am default Ctor");
        a =1;
        b =1;
    }

    public ParameterizedCtor(int a, int b) {
        System.out.println(" I am Parameterized Ctor");
        a=a;
        b=b;

    }
    public void print() {
        System.out.println(" a = "+a);
        System.out.println(" b = "+b);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        ParameterizedCtor c = new ParameterizedCtor(3, 1);
        c.print();
    }

}

What is the reason?

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The un-initialized private variables a and b are set to zero by default. And the overloading c'tctor comes into place.ie, parameterCtor(int a, int b) will be called from main and the local variables a & b are set to 3 and 1, but the class variables a and b are still zero. Hence, a=0, b=0 (default c'tor will not be called).

To set the class variable, use:

this.a = a;
this.b = b;
share|improve this answer

You need to do this:

public ParameterizedCtor(int a, int b) {
    System.out.println(" I am Parameterized Ctor");
    this.a=a;
    this.b=b;
}

otherwise, you're just re-assigning the a and b parameters to themselves.

share|improve this answer

this is called variable shadowing and default value of int is 0

make it like

 public ParameterizedCtor(int a, int b) {
        System.out.println(" I am Parameterized Ctor");
        this.a=a;
        this.b=b;
 }  

Also See

share|improve this answer

use

this.a = a;
this.b = b;

instead of

a = a;
b = b;
share|improve this answer

use

this.a = a;
this.b = b;

instead of

a = a;
b = b;
share|improve this answer

This code

a=a;
b=b;

is assigning the value in 'a' to the parameter 'a'. What you intended is likely to be.

this.a=a;
this.b=b;

BTW: This shows as warning in my IDE.

share|improve this answer

You have a local variable called a and a member variable called a, so you need to use this.a to refer to the member variable, as a refers to the local variable.

It might be a better idea to rename the local variable so that it is not the same as the member variable.

share|improve this answer
public class thisDemo {
    public int x=1;
    public int y=2;

    String[] l=new String[1];String[] m=new String[1];String[] n=new String[1];

   public thisDemo(int a,int b)
           {
               this.x=14;
               this.y=4;
           }
   public thisDemo(String a[],String b[],String c[])
   {
       this.l[0]=a[0];
       this.m[0]=b[0];
       this.n[0]=c[0];
   }
   public thisDemo()
   {

   }
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        thisDemo thi=new thisDemo(2, 3);
        System.out.println(thi.getClass());
        System.out.println(thi.x+" "+thi.y);

        thisDemo td=new thisDemo();
        System.out.println(td.getClass());
        System.out.println("x="+td.x+"y="+td.y);

        String xA[]={"a"};
        String yA[]={"b"};
        String zA[]={"c"};
       thisDemo tsd=new thisDemo(xA,yA,zA);
       System.out.println(tsd.getClass());
       System.out.println(tsd.l[0]+" "+tsd.m[0]+" "+tsd.n[0]);
    }

}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.