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How do you define Global variables in Java ?

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14  
Can you tell us why you want to define global variables in Java? –  Adam Paynter Jan 10 '11 at 12:02
13  
To access the variable from outside the class –  aTJ Jan 10 '11 at 12:05
2  
Perhaps you should edit your question to include some sample code illustrating precisely what you want. It would help us recommend the best solution. –  Adam Paynter Jan 10 '11 at 12:08
5  
@Adam :I should be able to change the value of a variable in one class from another class. –  aTJ Jan 10 '11 at 12:32

17 Answers 17

up vote 97 down vote accepted

To define Global Variable you can make use of static Keyword

public class Example {
    public static int a;
    public static int b;
}

now you can access a and b from anywhere by calling

Example.a;

Example.b;
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4  
Is there any keyword like 'Global' in Java.....I din't get it –  aTJ Jan 10 '11 at 12:35
4  
"Global" is the name of the class. –  Jerome Jan 10 '11 at 12:37
8  
Be careful when doing this - when the Global class gets unloaded the variables will be undefined null. If you sell your app this will happen sooner or later and you keep looking for error everywhere but not there.... –  user387184 Nov 5 '11 at 19:55
8  
The static keyword makes variables globally accessible, while their class is loaded. –  sjas Jan 29 '12 at 13:22
8  
About class unloading: if there is any strong reference chain from any GC Root to an instance of Global or its children, or any compile-time reference from a loaded and not-unloadable class to Global, then the Class object relative to Global is strongly reachable, and, therefore, so is the ClassLoader that loaded Global; which makes it impossible to unload Global (since class unloading can only happen after the GC completely removes any strong reference to the ClassLoader that loaded a given class). If you have no references at all, how could the unloading be a problem??? –  Bruno Reis Jul 25 '13 at 1:59

You don't. That's by design. You shouldn't do it even if you could.

That being said you could create a set of public static members in a class named Globals.

public class Globals {
   public static int globalInt = 0;
   ///
}

but you really shouldn't :). Seriously .. don't do it.

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1  
okay...I get it –  aTJ Jan 11 '11 at 6:17
    
as I have written above - when the class gets unloaded the variables loose their values to null and your app will crash. –  user387184 Nov 5 '11 at 19:57
    
#user387184 read the comment of #BrunoReis above. –  Sergio Dec 18 '13 at 7:51
    
Then what's the better approach that I can declare constants so that all class methods can access them? –  Stallman Jun 11 at 11:35

You are better off using dependency injection:

public class Globals {
    public int a;
    public int b;
}

public class UsesGlobals {
    private final Globals globals;
    public UsesGlobals(Globals globals) {
        this.globals = globals;
    }
}
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4  
True, though I think your use of "Globals" confuses things a bit :-). Something like "Parameters" would be more fitting since it's not necessarily Global. –  Mark Peters Jan 10 '11 at 15:46

Another way is to create an interface like this:

public interface GlobalConstants
{
  String name = "Chilly Billy";
  String address = "10 Chicken head Lane";
}

Any class that needs to use them only has to implement the interface:

public class GlobalImpl implements GlobalConstants
{
  public GlobalImpl()
  {
     System.out.println(name);
  }
}
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I'm wondering why this answer has (before mine) no up-votes. Does it not provide a reasonable alternative answer to that provided by all the other answers? –  M_M Aug 19 '12 at 21:29
1  
I think this is the best answer of the lot... –  Cupidvogel Jan 22 '13 at 19:38
    
This is bad practice -> GlobalImpl implements GlobalConstants –  MariuszS Apr 14 '13 at 11:56
5  
Effective Java by Joshua Bloch, Chapter 4: Classes and Interfaces, Item 19: Use interfaces only to define types "The constant interface pattern is a poor use of interfaces." This book is worth reading! :) –  MariuszS Apr 15 '13 at 20:37
5  
.... Right, that doesn't actually explain anything, that just says that some book said it was bad. –  linkhyrule5 Aug 2 '13 at 20:38

Truly speaking there is not a concept of "GLOBAL" in a java OO program

Nevertheless there is some truth behind your question because there will be some cases where you want to run a method at any part of the program. For example---random() method in Phrase-O-Matic app;it is a method should be callable from anywhere of a program.

So in order to satisfy the things like Above "We need to have Global-like variables and methods"

TO DECLARE A VARIABLE AS GLOBAL.

 1.Mark the variable as public static final While declaring.

TO DECLARE A METHOD AS GLOBAL.

 1. Mark the method as public static While declaring.

Because I declared global variables and method as static you can call them anywhere you wish by simply with the help of following code

ClassName.X

NOTE: X can be either method name or variable name as per the requirement and ClassName is the name of the class in which you declared them.

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Nothing should be global, except for constants.

public class MyMainClass {
    public final static boolean DEBUGMODE=true;
}

Put this within your main class. In other .java files, use it through:

if(MyMainClass.DEBUGMODE) System.out.println("Some debugging info");

Make sure when you move your code off the cutting room floor and into release you remove or comment out this functionality.

If you have a workhorse method, like a randomizer, I suggest creating a "Toolbox" package! All coders should have one, then whenever you want to use it in a .java, just import it!

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There is no such thing as a truly global variable in Java. Every static variable must belong to some class (like System.out), but when you have decided which class it will go in, you can refer to it from everywhere loaded by the same classloader.

Note that static variables should always be protected when updating to avoid race conditions.

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1  
java doesnt provide global variable functionally but if you want to have a global variable concept, we can make use of static keyword –  Abi Jan 10 '11 at 12:25
public class GlobalClass {
     public static int x = 37;
     public static String s = "aaa";
}

This way you can access them with GlobalClass.x and GlobalClass.s

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public class GlobalImpl {   

 public static int global = 5;

}

you can call anywhere you want:

GlobalImpl.global // 5
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As you probably guess from the answer there is no global variables in Java and the only thing you can do is to create a class with static members:

public class Global {
    public static int a;
}

You can use it with Global.a elsewhere. However if you use Java 1.5 or better you can use the import static magic to make it look even more as a real global variable:

import static test.Global.*;

public class UseGlobal {
    public void foo() {
        int i = a;
    }
}

And voilà!

Now this is far from a best practice so as you can see in the commercials: don't do this at home

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There are no global variables in Java, but there are global classes with public fields. You can use static import feature of java 5 to make it look almost like global variables.

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Lots of good answers, but I want to give this example as it's considered the more proper way to access variables of a class by another class using getters and setters. The reason why you use getters and setters this way instead of just making the variable public is as follows. Lets say your var is going to be a global parameter that you NEVER want someone to change during the execution of your program(in the case when you are developing code with a team), something like maybe the URL for a website. In theory this could change and may be used many times in your program, so you want to use a global var to be able to update it all at once. But you do not want someone else to go in and change this var(possibly without realizing how important it is). In that case you simply do not include a setter method, and only include the getter method.

public class Global{
    private static int var = 5;

    public static int getVar(){
        return this.var;
    }

    //If you do not want to change the var ever then do not include this
    public static void setVar(int var){
        this.var = var;
    }
}
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Generally Global variable (I assume you are comparing it with C,Cpp) define as public static final

like

class GlobalConstant{
    public static final String CODE  = "cd";
}

ENUMs are also useful in such scenario :

For Example Calendar.JANUARY)

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Does a global variable need to be final? Why? –  Konerak Jan 10 '11 at 12:05
1  
"final" means "constant", so this is a global constant. –  duffymo Jan 10 '11 at 12:07
    
final is like const of C –  Jigar Joshi Jan 10 '11 at 12:07
1  
If it is final, then we cannot change the value of CODE anywhere rt ??.. –  aTJ Jan 10 '11 at 12:09
1  
no , thats what Global variable means for if you want to share that variable and change the data also then just remove final but it certainly depends how you want to share , where you are using and all , –  Jigar Joshi Jan 10 '11 at 12:13
// Get the access of global while retaining priveleges.
// You can access variables in one class from another, with provisions.
// The primitive must be protected or no modifier (seen in example).

// the first class
public class farm{

  int eggs; // an integer to be set by constructor
  fox afox; // declaration of a fox object

  // the constructor inits
  farm(){
    eggs = 4;
    afox = new fox(); // an instance of a fox object

    // show count of eggs before the fox arrives
    System.out.println("Count of eggs before: " + eggs);

    // call class fox, afox method, pass myFarm as a reference
    afox.stealEgg(this);

    // show the farm class, myFarm, primitive value
    System.out.println("Count of eggs after : " + eggs);

  } // end constructor

  public static void main(String[] args){

    // instance of a farm class object
    farm myFarm = new farm();

  }; // end main

} // end class

// the second class
public class fox{

  // theFarm is the myFarm object instance
  // any public, protected, or "no modifier" variable is accessible
  void stealEgg(farm theFarm){ --theFarm.eggs; }

} // end class
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What does this answer add that the other answers don't? I can't see any "new" value in this answer. –  EWit Jul 19 at 7:31

the word "static" defines a variable as global. As long as you have it before the variable it can be used in other classes

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Alternatively you could make the class static, so that all your global variables are static by default without repetition of the static keyword.

static class Global {

    public int globalStuff = 0;

}
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5  
Only inner classes can be static. See stackoverflow.com/questions/3584113/java-static-class –  FiveO Aug 29 '12 at 19:18

To define Global Variable you can make use of static Keyword

public final class Tools {
  public static int a;
  public static int b;
}

now you can access a and b from anywhere by calling

Tools.a;
Tools.b;

Yoy are right...specially in J2ME... You can avoid NullPointerException by putting inside your MidLet constructor (proggy initialization) this line of code:

new Tools();

This ensures that Tools will be allocated before any instruction that uses it.

That's it!

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2  
Um... Sorry, but what does this add that isn't already covered by the existing answers? –  Mysticial Jul 25 '13 at 1:07
    
Maybe you are right..but this answer explain things like memory allocation. –  user2616742 Jul 25 '13 at 2:50
    
There are not static top-level classes in java –  Andremoniy Jul 25 '13 at 13:59

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