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Is there any way to write a using statement without instantiating the IDisposable immediately?

For example, if I needed to do something like:

using (MyThing thing)
{
    if (_config == null)
    {
         thing = new MyThing();
    }
    else
    {
         thing = new MyThing(_config);
    }

    // do some stuff

} // end of 'using'

Is there an accepted pattern for cases like this? Or am I back to handling the IDisposable explicitly again?

share|improve this question
    
3 (almost) identical responses in under a minute. Nice! :D – Rob Jan 10 '11 at 12:50
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, in your example you do instantiate the disposable object immediately - just based on a condition. For example, you could use:

using (MyThing thing = _config == null ? new MyThing() : new MyThing(_config))
{
    ...
}

To be more general, you can use a method:

using (MyThing thing = CreateThing(_config))
{
}

The tricky bit would be if the timing of the instantiation changed based on various conditions. That would indeed be harder to handle with a using statement, but would also suggest that you should try to refactor your code to avoid that requirement. It won't always be possible, but it's worth trying.

Another alternative is to encapsulate the "thing" in a wrapper which will lazily create the real disposable object appropriately, and delegate to that for disposal and anything else that you can do with the type. Delegation like this can be a pain in some situations, but it might be appropriate - depending on what you're really trying to do.

share|improve this answer
    
thorough and informative as always sir, thank you. – fearofawhackplanet Jan 10 '11 at 13:10

I think the most sane solution is to move the decision of what to with the config into the MyThing constructor. That way you could simplify the usage of the class like so:

using (MyThing thing = new MyThing(_config))
{

} 

class MyThing {
  public MyThing() {
    //default constructor
  }

  public MyThing(Config config) :this() {
    if (config == null)
    {
         //do nothing, default constructor did all the work already
    }
    else
    {
         //do additional stuff with config
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

You could do:

if (_config == null)
{
     thing = new MyThing();
}
else
{
     thing = new MyThing(_config);
}

using (thing)
{

    // do some stuff
}
share|improve this answer
using (MyThing thing = _config == null ? new MyThing() : new MyThing(_config))
{
   // ....

}
share|improve this answer

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