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Pairs from single list

I have a list of small integers, say:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

I wish to collect the sequential pairs and return a new list containing tuples created from those pairs, i.e.:

[(1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6)]

I know there must be a really simple way to do this, but can't quite work it out.

Thanks

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marked as duplicate by Jochen Ritzel, SilentGhost, Gilbert Le Blanc, Tim Pietzcker, Graviton Jan 11 '11 at 11:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Is this homework? If so, please use the [homework] tag. –  S.Lott Jan 10 '11 at 13:00
2  
possible duplicate of Pairs from single list and many others. –  Jochen Ritzel Jan 10 '11 at 13:05
    
@S.Lott, why could it be a homework? Does it look like from your experience? –  Senthil Kumaran Jan 10 '11 at 13:06
    
Not homework, personal interest –  TartanLlama Jan 10 '11 at 13:09
1  
I'm not sure what "impractical" even means in this situation. Software challenges are often the result of data being in impractical shapes. Consider an old way of organizing data that must change due to new business requirements. A judgement like "impractical" is full of assumptions and speculation based in smoke. –  jaydel Jan 10 '11 at 13:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Well there is one very easy, but somewhat fragile way, zip it with sliced versions of itself.

zipped = zip(mylist[0::2], mylist[1::2])

In case you didn't know, the last slice parameter is the "step". So we select every second item in the list starting from zero (1, 3, 5). Then we do the same but starting from one (2, 4, 6) and make tuples out of them with zip.

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Why is this fragile? –  Piotr Dobrogost Jan 10 '11 at 13:11
3  
An odd number of elements may have surprising results. Also, a zero-length list will behave badly. –  S.Lott Jan 10 '11 at 13:17

Straight from the Python documentation of the itertools module:

from itertools import tee, izip

def pairwise(iterable):
    "s -> (s0,s1), (s1,s2), (s2, s3), ..."
    a, b = tee(iterable)
    next(b, None)
    return izip(a, b)

l = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
for pair in pairwise(l):
    print pair
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+1. Aye, there arrived a more robust way :D –  Skurmedel Jan 10 '11 at 13:04
3  
This doesn't quite give what the OP requested - it prints (1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 4), (4, 5), (5, 6) instead of (1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6) –  Daniel Roseman Jan 10 '11 at 13:06
2  
The right function is grouper, right below this one in the itertools recipes ;) –  Jochen Ritzel Jan 10 '11 at 13:11
    
Upvoted, because this it is what I wanted, although it isn't what OP wanted. Man, am I a bad citizen. –  Bengt Sep 18 '12 at 9:00

Apart from the above answers, you also need to know the simplest of way too (if you hadn't known already)

l = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
o = [(l[i],l[i+1]) for i in range(0,len(l),2)]
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I'd completely forgot about the optional step parameter to range –  TartanLlama Jan 10 '11 at 13:12
    
why do you substract 2 from length? it's wrong. –  SilentGhost Jan 10 '11 at 13:15
    
This will silently drop the last element of an odd-length list. Is that appropriate? Or should it raise some kind of exception? –  S.Lott Jan 10 '11 at 13:18
    
@S.Lott: this sort of question typically deal only with even-length lists. –  SilentGhost Jan 10 '11 at 13:19

Apart from the above answers, you also need to know the simplest of way too (if you hadn't known already)

l = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
o = [(l[i],l[i+1]) for i in range(0,len(l)-2,2)]

here should be o = [(l[i],l[i+1]) for i in range(0,len(l),2)], as range(0, len(l) - 2, 2) will only generate 0 and 2

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Thanks Meng, I corrected the mistake above. –  Senthil Kumaran Jan 10 '11 at 14:15
    
Please format your code properly. Use the {} button. –  S.Lott Jan 10 '11 at 14:41

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