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Consider the following code:

class CString
{
private:
    char* buff;
    size_t len;

public:
    CString(const char* p):len(0), buff(nullptr)
    {
        cout << "Constructor called!"<<endl;
        if (p!=nullptr)
        {
            len= strlen(p);
            if (len>0)
            {
                buff= new char[len+1];
                strcpy_s(buff, len+1, p);               
            }           
        }       
    }

    CString (const CString& s)
    {
        cout << "Copy constructor called!"<<endl;
        len= s.len;
        buff= new char[len+1];
        strcpy_s(buff, len+1, s.buff);      
    }

    CString& operator = (const CString& rhs)
    {
        cout << "Assignment operator called!"<<endl;
        if (this != &rhs)
        {
            len= rhs.len;
            delete[] buff;          
            buff= new char[len+1];
            strcpy_s(buff, len+1, rhs.buff);
        }

        return *this;
    }

    CString operator + (const CString& rhs) const
    {
        cout << "Addition operator called!"<<endl;

        size_t lenght= len+rhs.len+1;
        char* tmp = new char[lenght];
        strcpy_s(tmp, lenght, buff);
        strcat_s(tmp, lenght, rhs.buff);

        return CString(tmp);
    }

    ~CString()
    {
        cout << "Destructor called!"<<endl;
        delete[] buff;
    }     
};

int main()
{
CString s1("Hello");
CString s2("World");
CString s3 = s1+s2;     
}

My problem is that I don't know how to delete the memory allocated in the addition operator function(char* tmp = new char[length]). I couldn't do this in the constructor(I tried delete[] p) because it is also called from the main function with arrays of chars as parameters which are not allocated on the heap...How can I get around this? (Sorry for my bad English...)

share|improve this question
    
You also need to work on your assignment operator (its not safe (prefer Copy and Swap Idium)). See below. –  Loki Astari Jan 10 '11 at 20:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The addition function should return a CString, not a CString&. In the addition function, you should construct the return value, then delete[] temp as it is no longer needed, since inside the CString class you make a memory copy.

CString operator + (const CString& rhs) const
{
    cout << "Addition operator called!"<<endl;

    size_t lenght= len+rhs.len+1;
    char* tmp = new char[lenght];
    strcpy_s(tmp, lenght, buff);
    strcat_s(tmp, lenght, rhs.buff);

    CString retval(tmp);
    delete[] tmp;
    return retval;
}
share|improve this answer
    
So you create a new instance of CString inside a non static method? I don't think is a very good implementation at all –  trojanfoe Jan 10 '11 at 13:16
2  
@trojanfoe: That's how operator+ is normally implemented. How else are you going to return a CString except by creating a new one? –  Puppy Jan 10 '11 at 13:17
    
@DeadMG thank you very much! it was simple after all, all i should do is creating the object without returning it immediately to have time to delete the array! –  kiokko89 Jan 10 '11 at 13:18
    
@DeadMG: yeah my implementation is 'operator +='... oops :) –  trojanfoe Jan 10 '11 at 13:18
    
I would instead suggest to create a private ctor accepting an additional argument, stating whether ownership is passed or not. That way you could avoid the extra dynamic allocate/copy/free cycle and more easily allow RVO in operator+. –  Cwan Jan 10 '11 at 13:52

Problems:

In your assignment operator you are failing to provide any exception guarantees. You are deleting buffer before you have guaranteed that the operation will succeed. If something does go wrong your object will be left in an undefined state.

CString& operator = (const CString& rhs)
{
    cout << "Assignment operator called!"<<endl;
    if (this != &rhs)
    {
        len= rhs.len;
        delete[] buff;          
        buff= new char[len+1];   /// BOOM 

        // If you throw here buff now points at undefined memory.
        // If this is an automatic variable the destructor is still going
        // to be called and you will get a double delete.

        // All operations that can fail should be done BEFORE the object is modified.

        strcpy_s(buff, len+1, rhs.buff);
    }

    return *this;
}

We can correct these problems by moving things around (and using a temp).

CString& operator = (const CString& rhs)
{
    cout << "Assignment operator called!"<<endl;
    if (this != &rhs)
    {
        char* tmp = new char[len+1];
        strcpy_s(tmp, rhs.len+1, rhs.buff); // for char this will never fail
                                            // But if it was another type the copy
                                            // may potentially fail. So you must
                                            // do the copy before changing the curren
                                            // objects state.

        // Now we can change the state of the object safely.
        len= rhs.len;
        std::swap(tmp,buff);

        delete tmp;
    }

    return *this;
}

An even better solution is to use the copy and swap idium:

CString& operator = (CString rhs) // Note pass by value to get auto copy.
{                                 // Most compilers will then do NRVO
    this->swap(rhs);
    // Simply swap the tmp rhs with this.
    // Note that tmp was created with copy constructor.
    // When rhs goes out of scope it will delete the object.
}

void swap(CString& rhs)
{
    std::swap(len,  rhs.len);
    std::swap(buff, rhs.buff);
}

Now lets deal with your + operator

CString operator + (const CString& rhs) const
{
    // You could optimize this by providing a private constructor
    // that takes two char pointers so that allocation is only done
    // once.
    CString result(*this);
    return result += rhs;
}

CString operator += (const CString& rhs)
{
    size_t lenght= len+rhs.len+1;

    // Char are easy. No chance of failure.
    // But if this was a type with a copy constructor or any other complex
    // processing involved in the copy then I would make tmp a smart pointer
    // to make sure that it's memory was not leaked if there was an exception.
    char* tmp = new char[lenght];

    strcpy_s(tmp, lenght, buff);
    strcat_s(tmp, lenght, rhs.buff);

    std::swap(len, length);
    std::swap(buff, tmp);

    delete tmp;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your explanation. I'm just a beginner but you gave me some good tips to understand how these things should be done... –  kiokko89 Jan 10 '11 at 21:44

first of all, operator+ should return new object, not to modify one of operands of +, so it better should be declared as a non-member (probably friend) function. first implement operator+= and then using it - operator+, and you won't have this problem.

CString operator+(CString const& lh, CString const& rh)
{
    CString res(lh);
    return res += rh;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
A small optimization: You can pass the lh by value. This will give you the copy without actually having to create the temporary. (I know it becomes harder to read (and I always add a comment about passing by value when I do it)) But it also helps the compiler with NRVO. I believe GMAN wrote an excellent article on the subject. @Gman I can't find it if you could point it out. –  Loki Astari Jan 10 '11 at 19:46
    
tnx, I like this approach –  Andy T Jan 10 '11 at 20:59
    CString& operator + (const CString& rhs) const

{
    cout << "Addition operator called!"<<endl;

    size_t lenght= len+rhs.len+1;
    char* tmp = new char[lenght];
    strcpy_s(tmp, lenght, buff);
    strcat_s(tmp, lenght, rhs.buff);
    CString tempObj(tmp);
    delete [] tmp;
    return tempObj;
}

For example,

share|improve this answer
1  
returning reference to local variable??? –  Andy T Jan 10 '11 at 13:11
    
It was my mistake... i misspelled the return type, it should be CString and not CString&(now i edited the post). Anyway all of you helped me a lot with this...Thanks! –  kiokko89 Jan 10 '11 at 13:29

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