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Is it possible for a file in the plugin directory to be used as a custom Page Template?

Also, how do you make a plugin create a page?

I'm developing a plugin for a client based on a theme, he wants this plugin to make sales pages while being able to use his theme on the homepage. This is a product that I'm making for him to market so it needs to be automated all through the plugin.

Is this possible?

EDIT

I have the activation/deactivation hooks in my plugins main file, and it's not working. Here's the code:

$filename = __FILE__;

register_activation_hook($filename, 'superActivation');
register_deactivation_hook($filename, 'superDeactivation');

global $myFile; global $fh; global $stringData; global $filename;

$myFile = "testFile.txt";
$stringData = "Testing\n";
$fh = fopen($myFile, 'w') or die("can't open file");

function superActivation() {
    global $myFile; global $fh; global $stringData; global $filename;
    fwrite($fh, $stringData);
    fclose($fh);
}

function superDeactivation() {
    $myFile = "testFile.txt";
    unlink($myFile);
}
share|improve this question
1  
You'll need to check the active theme directory is writable before being able to create a file there(i think). With regard to having a plugin supply a page template, yes that certainly can be done, you'd need to hook onto template_redirect and adjust the path to the template that's about to be called. In future, please consider posting your WordPress questions to wordpress.stackexchange.com –  t31os Jan 10 '11 at 20:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 28 down vote accepted

You can do this with the template_redirect hook. Here's my code to manually replace the template for a custom post type with one in the theme if there isn't one in the template folder. Put this in your plugin file and then put a folder underneath your plugin called themefiles with your default theme files.

//Template fallback
add_action("template_redirect", 'my_theme_redirect');

function my_theme_redirect() {
    global $wp;
    $plugindir = dirname( __FILE__ );

    //A Specific Custom Post Type
    if ($wp->query_vars["post_type"] == 'product') {
        $templatefilename = 'single-product.php';
        if (file_exists(TEMPLATEPATH . '/' . $templatefilename)) {
            $return_template = TEMPLATEPATH . '/' . $templatefilename;
        } else {
            $return_template = $plugindir . '/themefiles/' . $templatefilename;
        }
        do_theme_redirect($return_template);

    //A Custom Taxonomy Page
    } elseif ($wp->query_vars["taxonomy"] == 'product_categories') {
        $templatefilename = 'taxonomy-product_categories.php';
        if (file_exists(TEMPLATEPATH . '/' . $templatefilename)) {
            $return_template = TEMPLATEPATH . '/' . $templatefilename;
        } else {
            $return_template = $plugindir . '/themefiles/' . $templatefilename;
        }
        do_theme_redirect($return_template);

    //A Simple Page
    } elseif ($wp->query_vars["pagename"] == 'somepagename') {
        $templatefilename = 'page-somepagename.php';
        if (file_exists(TEMPLATEPATH . '/' . $templatefilename)) {
            $return_template = TEMPLATEPATH . '/' . $templatefilename;
        } else {
            $return_template = $plugindir . '/themefiles/' . $templatefilename;
        }
        do_theme_redirect($return_template);
    }
}

function do_theme_redirect($url) {
    global $post, $wp_query;
    if (have_posts()) {
        include($url);
        die();
    } else {
        $wp_query->is_404 = true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But it's not going to include 'header', 'footer'. Right ? –  Jashwant Apr 6 at 7:24
    
Not unless you put get_header(); and get_footer(); in the template file. –  David Apr 7 at 15:27
    
Yeah, that is going to make problem in theme which uses 'theme wrappers' like roots :( Any idea about those ? –  Jashwant Apr 7 at 16:05
    
I don't have any good answer for that. That's the exact problem I run into. Thesis, Roots, Headway - these all cause huge problems with this approach. (Don't get me on a soapbox about theme devs who build non-standard themes!) What I've had to do is to create custom wrappers for each of these theme frameworks. Here's an example of what I did with Thesis: soapboxdave.com/2012/04/… –  David Apr 8 at 16:31
1  
According to the WP Codex, it is better to use template_include. "Loading a different template is not a good use of this action hook. If you include another template and then use exit() (or die()), no subsequent template_redirect hooks will be run, which could break the site's functionality. Instead, use the template_include filter hook to return the path to the new template you want to use. This will allow an alternative template to be used without interfering with the WordPress loading process." codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Action_Reference/… –  user1912899 Jun 10 at 18:27

the code david posted above almost works for me. but it seems to blanket over all posts and pages for me. This code below works great for adding a template to a single post type that is created by my main plugin file

function get_book_post_type_template($single_template) {
 global $post;

 if ($post->post_type == 'books') {
      $single_template = dirname( __FILE__ ) . '/themefiles/single-books.php';
 }
 return $single_template;
}

add_filter( "single_template", "get_book_post_type_template" ) ;

but I'm having trouble getting it to work with a custom page templates that don't have a post_type or has a post_type = page for instance lets say the custom page is an auxiliary member login page to see my custom posts. in my case this file is called myaccount.php and i've included it in a subfolder within my plugin folder named themefiles.

//Add Page and Post Template Files to Current Theme 
add_action("template_redirect", 'my_account_redirect');

function my_account_redirect() {
    global $wp;

    //Set myAccount Custom Page Template 
    if (isset($wp->query_vars['pagename'] ) == "myaccount") {
        $templatefilename = 'myAccount.php';
        if (file_exists(dirname( __FILE__ ) . '/themefiles/' . $templatefilename)) {
            $return_template = dirname( __FILE__ ) . '/themefiles/' . $templatefilename;
        }
        do_account_redirect($return_template);
    } 
} 

//Finishing setting templates 
function do_account_redirect($url) {
    global $post, $wp_query;

    if (have_posts()) {
        include($url);
        die();
    } else {
        $wp_query->is_404 = true;
    }
}

when i do the above code the myaccount template shows up on all pages except for home which i believe is because it is set to a blogroll instead of a static page

share|improve this answer

You CAN add page templates from a plugin very easily by manipulating the page cache.

To customise, simply edit the following code block within the __construct method;

   $this->templates = array(
       'goodtobebad-template.php'     => 'It\'s Good to Be Bad',
   );

This is designed for a plugin (the template files are searched for in the root directory of the plugin). This can be changed if desired - check out my full tutorial http://www.wpexplorer.com/wordpress-page-templates-plugin/ for greater detail on this solution. These files are also in exactly the same format as if they were to be included directly in a theme.

Full code;

class PageTemplater {

    /**
     * A Unique Identifier
     */
     protected $plugin_slug;

    /**
     * A reference to an instance of this class.
     */
    private static $instance;

    /**
     * The array of templates that this plugin tracks.
     */
    protected $templates;


    /**
     * Returns an instance of this class. 
     */
    public static function get_instance() {

            if( null == self::$instance ) {
                    self::$instance = new PageTemplater();
            } 

            return self::$instance;

    } 

    /**
     * Initializes the plugin by setting filters and administration functions.
     */
    private function __construct() {

            $this->templates = array();


            // Add a filter to the attributes metabox to inject template into the cache.
            add_filter(
                'page_attributes_dropdown_pages_args',
                 array( $this, 'register_project_templates' ) 
            );


            // Add a filter to the save post to inject out template into the page cache
            add_filter(
                'wp_insert_post_data', 
                array( $this, 'register_project_templates' ) 
            );


            // Add a filter to the template include to determine if the page has our 
            // template assigned and return it's path
            add_filter(
                'template_include', 
                array( $this, 'view_project_template') 
            );


            // Add your templates to this array.
            $this->templates = array(
                    'goodtobebad-template.php'     => 'It\'s Good to Be Bad',
            );

    } 


    /**
     * Adds our template to the pages cache in order to trick WordPress
     * into thinking the template file exists where it doens't really exist.
     *
     */

    public function register_project_templates( $atts ) {

            // Create the key used for the themes cache
            $cache_key = 'page_templates-' . md5( get_theme_root() . '/' . get_stylesheet() );

            // Retrieve the cache list. 
            // If it doesn't exist, or it's empty prepare an array
            $templates = wp_get_theme()->get_page_templates();
            if ( empty( $templates ) ) {
                    $templates = array();
            } 

            // New cache, therefore remove the old one
            wp_cache_delete( $cache_key , 'themes');

            // Now add our template to the list of templates by merging our templates
            // with the existing templates array from the cache.
            $templates = array_merge( $templates, $this->templates );

            // Add the modified cache to allow WordPress to pick it up for listing
            // available templates
            wp_cache_add( $cache_key, $templates, 'themes', 1800 );

            return $atts;

    } 

    /**
     * Checks if the template is assigned to the page
     */
    public function view_project_template( $template ) {

            global $post;

            if (!isset($this->templates[get_post_meta( 
                $post->ID, '_wp_page_template', true 
            )] ) ) {

                    return $template;

            } 

            $file = plugin_dir_path(__FILE__). get_post_meta( 
                $post->ID, '_wp_page_template', true 
            );

            // Just to be safe, we check if the file exist first
            if( file_exists( $file ) ) {
                    return $file;
            } 
            else { echo $file; }

            return $template;

    } 


} 

add_action( 'plugins_loaded', array( 'PageTemplater', 'get_instance' ) );

Check out my tutorial on this for more info.

http://www.wpexplorer.com/wordpress-page-templates-plugin/

I hope this helps you in what you want to do :)

share|improve this answer
    
How would you extend this to possibly pass an array into the _construct()? As if this was a library class being used by multiple plugins. In my attempt so far I get the templates (from array) to appear in the dropdown, but every time I save/publish the value is wiped clean :( Any thoughts on this? –  Xtremefaith Sep 15 at 18:38
  1. Don't know , and i think you can't use a plugin file to be used as a custom page template . Tough you're pluggin can create a file in the active template folder .

  2. To create a page you can use $wpdb class and insert a new post or easyer with wp_insert_post and change post_type to "page" , have a look at the documentation of wpdb class too , it might be usefull in some cases .


Edit

There are 2 hooks that you can use to create / delete the file , check it out :

$filename = __FILE__;
register_activation_hook($filename, 'myPlugginActivation');
register_deactivation_hook($filename, 'myPlugginDeactivation');
function myPlugginActivation()
{
//create file here , this function will be called
//by wordpress on pluggin activation
}
function myPlugginDeactivation()
{
//delete file here , this function will be called
//by wordpress on pluggin deactivation
}

Edit

Save this file to test.php and place it inside you're pluggins dir , then you can go to wordpress wp-admin , plugins page and activate the "Test-File" pluggin , after that check you're active theme folder for a file called "myTheme.php" witch was writen by the pluggin at activation .

<?php
/*
Plugin Name: Test-File
Plugin URI: http://www.google.ro
Description: Test writing a file to the active pluggin directory
Version: 0.1
Author: Poelinca Dorin
*/
$plugginFile = __FILE__;
$themeDir = get_theme_root() . '/' . get_current_theme();
$customThemeFile = 'myTheme.php';

register_activation_hook($plugginFile, 'myActivation');
register_deactivation_hook($plugginFile, 'myDeactivation');

if ( !function_exists('myActivation') )
{
    function myActivation()
    {
        global $themeDir;
        global $customThemeFile;
        $stringData = '<h1>Some test template</h1>';

        $fh = fopen($themeDir . '/' . $customThemeFile, 'w') or die('cant open file');
        fwrite($fh, $stringData);
        fclose($fh);
    }
}

if ( !function_exists('myDeactivation') )
{
    function myDeactivation()
    {
        global $themeDir;
        global $customThemeFile;

        @unlink($themeDir . '/' . $customThemeFile);
    }
}
?>

Now to be honest and with no offence in mind , if you can't handle php file writes don't start to build a wp plugin , spend atleast two months learning more about php and how it works , then play with allready built plugins just to make shure you know how wordpress works .

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm going to be using wp_insert_post for sure, and that gives me an idea what you said about the plugin creating a file in the active template folder. Is there a way for any created files to get deleted when the plugin is deactivated? –  Jared Jan 10 '11 at 14:37
    
see my edit , basicly there are 2 hooks that run on pluggin activation and deactivation , you can use those to create and delete the file . –  Poelinca Dorin Jan 10 '11 at 14:42
    
Thanks, that's exactly what I was looking for. I appreciate it! But can you elaborate on the $filename = __FILE__;, what's the purpose for it and how does it work? –  Jared Jan 10 '11 at 15:28
    
register_activation_hook() and register_deactivation_hook() functions expect the first parameter to be "(string) (required) Path to the main plugin file inside the wp-content/plugins directory. A full path will work. Default: None" –  Poelinca Dorin Jan 10 '11 at 15:35
    
__FILE__ witch we assign to the $filename variable ( to be passed to the functions ) , is a PHP magic constant that returns the current file path and name . php.net/manual/en/language.constants.predefined.php ; so basicly what we do is use php magic constat to return the current file path and name ( we use this just to be shure we can change the file name in future without worring about changing the code inside ) , and we pass it to the wordpress functions , just as they expect . –  Poelinca Dorin Jan 10 '11 at 15:37

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