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My gui application supports polymorphic timed events so that means that the user calls new, and the gui calls delete. This can create a problem if the runtimes are incompatible.

So I was told a proposed solution would be this:

class base;

class Deallocator {
    void operator()(base* ptr) 
    {
        delete ptr;
    }
}

class base {
public:
base(Deallocator dealloc) 
{
    m_deleteFunc = dealloc;
}
~base() 
{
    m_deleteFunc(this);
}

private:
Deallocator m_deleteFunc;
}

int main
{
    Deallocator deletefunc;

    base baseObj(deletefunc);
}

While this is a good solution, it does demand that the user create a Deallocator object which I do not want. I was however wondering if I provided a Deallocator to each derived class: eg

class derived : public base
{
  Deallocator dealloc;
public:
  Derived() : base(dealloc);
{
}
};

I think this still does not work though. The constraint is that: The addTimedEvent() function is part of the Widget class which is also in the dll, but it is instanced by the user. The other constraint is that some classes which derive from Widget call this function with their own timed event classes.

Given that "he who called new must call delete" what could work given these constraints?

Thanks

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This blog post provides some solutions to this problem. –  Naveen Jan 10 '11 at 15:48
    
You have to make the base class destructor virtual. –  Hans Passant Jan 10 '11 at 16:09
    
@Hans: For the proposed (broken) mechanism in the question, yes the destructor should be virtual. But many of the well-known ways of handling the problem don't require virtual destruction. –  Ben Voigt Jan 10 '11 at 16:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I suggest that you study the COM reference-counting paradigm (AddRef and Release). This allows more flexible lifetime and guarantees that the correct deallocator is used, because the object deletes itself.

Please note that if you're sharing class objects across DLL boundaries, you could have much bigger problems that just using the same allocator. There's the whole one-definition-rule to account for, and calling conventions, data layout, and name mangling schemes that differ between compilers. So if you want a reusable library, you really need to adopt the COM way of doing things with reference counting, self-deletion, and an interface containing only pure virtual functions. Whether you build real COM objects or your own COM-like system would depend on your other requirements.

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The first thing that comes to mind is to give the base class a virtual (abstract?) SelfDestruct method. Assuming that the consumer of your DLL passes a class he derived himself, he will know how to deallocate it.

If he can pass classes which you have written, then you've got more problems. I suggest disallowing allocating such classes and providing a static method for allocating them with your own allocator.

I'm not sure if I've explained my idea very clearly... if not, please ask, I'll provide code later.

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What could work with the given constraints is that you associate a deleter function-pointer with each TimedEvent, where both are specified as arguments to addTimedEvent.
To relieve the burden of the client to create a custom deleter function, you can provide an inline deleter function as a member of the anonymous namespace in the header of your widget class.

For example:

// Widget header

class base;
namespace {
  inline void default_deleter(base* p) 
  { 
    delete p; 
  }
}

class Widget
{
public:
  addTimedEvent(base* event, void(*deleter)(base*));
};

The advantage of the inline function is that it will be compiled in the context of the client code, so delete will also use a compatible deallocator as the client used to allocate the event.

Edit: Made the deleter function a member of the anonymous namespace. This is needed to avoid ODR violations.
Without the namespace, you get two functions default_deleter that have the same external name (so they are the same as far as the linker is concerned), but with different semantics, because they refer to different deallocators.
With the anonymous namespace, all instances of default_deleter become separate entities for the linker. This has the (unfortunate) side-effect that you can no longer use the function as a default argument to addTimedEvent.

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Will this still work as expected if the widget called new? if not, how could that be done? Is it also a thread-safe solution? Thanks –  Milo Jan 10 '11 at 16:03
    
No, it's not safe. Inline function definitions in types shared across module boundaries cause all kinds of ODR violations –  Ben Voigt Jan 10 '11 at 16:12
    
@Ben Voigt: You are right. I have updated the answer to avoid the ODR violations. –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Jan 10 '11 at 16:27
    
@Milo: The only constraint is that new is used in the same (executable) module as the corresponding call to addTimedEvent. The Widget class will have a separate (pointer to a) deleter function for every registered event, so you have to make sure you match those up properly. –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Jan 10 '11 at 16:31

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