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I have a class containing many members of a simple class type. More importantly, their number is growing as I go on with the development.

I need to be able to reset them all at once, and I'd like to do it without copy-pasting them. The code currently looks like:

typedef auto_ptr<odbc::PreparedStatement> Stmt;

class DbProxy {
private:
  void reset();

  Stmt a;
  Stmt b;
  Stmt c;
  // ... about 10 more
};

void DbProxy::reset()
{
  a.reset();
  b.reset();
  c.reset();
  // etc.
}

Obviously I don't like having to add every new member to the reset() function (just had a seg. fault for forgetting one).

What I intend to do is to collect them all into a structure and to allocate this structure under auto_ptr. So the code would look like this:

typedef auto_ptr<odbc::PreparedStatement> Stmt;

class DbProxy {
public:
  DbProxy(): stmts(new OdbcResources) {}
private:
  void reset() { stmts.reset(); }

  struct OdbcResources {
    Stmt a;
    Stmt b;
    Stmt c;
    // ... about 10 more
  };
  auto_ptr<OdbcResources> stmts;
};

Objects of DbProxy are not intended to be copied or copy-constructed, although I didn't bother to ensure this by making the assignment and copy-ctor private.

Do you see any problem with this approach? Do you have other suggestions?

EDIT

based on @DeadMG suggestion, what about this:

class DbProxy {
public:
  DbProxy();
private:
  enum Statements { SELECT1, SELECT2, INSERT, LAST };  // never mind the names

  void reset() { for (int i=0; i < LAST; i++) statement[i].reset(); }

  Stmt statements[LAST];
};
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Can you put your Stmt objects into an array? That way you can handle any arbitrary number of them. –  Robert Harvey Jan 10 '11 at 16:21
    
why not a container of shared_ptr<> objects? –  Nim Jan 10 '11 at 16:24
    
@Robert, not possible these are auto_ptr - which cannot be stored in a container –  Nim Jan 10 '11 at 16:25
    
@Nim: They're all owned by the DbProxy class. What a waste of overhead to refcount them. –  Puppy Jan 10 '11 at 16:25
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's no need for the extra auto_ptr (each Stmt being an auto_ptr anyway), if you collect them in a single class you can reset them with a simple assignment. Unlike an array solution you still preserve their meaningful names.

Note that you can't use an unnamed temporary (e.g. stmts = OdbcResources();) as the generated copy assignment operator will take a non-const reference as the members (auto_ptr) cannot be assigned from non-const auto_ptrs.

class DbProxy {
public:
  DbProxy() : stmts() {}
private:
  void reset() { OdbcResources tmp; stmts = tmp; }

  struct OdbcResources {
    Stmt a;
    Stmt b;
    Stmt c;
    // ... about 10 more
  };
  OdbcResources stmts;
};
share|improve this answer
    
this is probably the simplest solution. Could you elaborate the second point, about the unnamed temporary? –  davka Jan 11 '11 at 8:26
2  
@davka: The compiler can't generate a copy assignment operator with the signature OdbcResources& operator=( const OdbcResources& ) because the memberwise assignment will fail for auto_ptr which takes a non-const reference in its copy assignment operator. The compiler has to generate a copy assignment operator with the signature OdbcResources& operator=( OdbcResources& ). Because you can't bind a temporary to a non-const reference stmts = OdbcResources() now won't compile. –  Charles Bailey Jan 11 '11 at 8:34
    
thanks, it's clear now –  davka Jan 11 '11 at 8:43
    
BTW, if so, why am I able to compile a line like this: aut_ptr<int> ip = auto_ptr<int>(new int);? –  davka Jan 11 '11 at 13:00
1  
@davka: Because auto_ptr has some implicit conversions to and from auto_ptr_ref that are specifically there to allow his sort of thing (otherwise assigning or constructing a std::auto_ptr from the std::auto_ptr returned by value from a function couldn't work and that's a very important use case). If you use containing structure: struct X { explicit X(int* q):p(q){} std::auto_ptr<int> p; }; then you don't have any such implicit conversion helpers and you'll see that X x = X(new int); won't work. –  Charles Bailey Jan 11 '11 at 13:20
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Use a statically sized array.

Stmt statements[10];

for(int i = 0; i < sizeof(statements) / sizeof(Stmt); i++)
    statements[i].reset();
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, it occurred to me, but there is an issue - currently they each have a meaningful name and are used in various methods provided by the DbProxy class. With an array, I will have to refer to them by statements[3] rather than insertStmt, which may cause errors and confusion. –  davka Jan 10 '11 at 16:32
    
I could perhaps use enum for this? please see the edit in my OP –  davka Jan 10 '11 at 16:33
    
@davka: You could simply make little helper functions. Stmt& GetInsertStmt() { return statements[3]; }. An enum will also do the job. enum { InsertStmt = 0, UpdateStmt = 1 }; where you can pass the enum directly as an array index. –  Puppy Jan 10 '11 at 16:37
    
you could store an array of pointers to them instead; this would require you to setup the array pointers once though, eg in constructor: statements[0]=&a; statements[1]=&b; etc –  stijn Jan 10 '11 at 16:38
    
@stijn: but this brings me back to the copy-paste I'd like to avoid... –  davka Jan 10 '11 at 16:51
show 3 more comments

This is crying out for a container - assuming odbc::PreparedStatement is copyable, simply have a vector of these in DbProxy

class DbProxy {
private:
  void reset() { resources.clear(); } // all vanish!

  vector<odbc::PreparedStatement> resources;
};

Else, shared_ptr

typedef shared_ptr<odbc::PreparedStatement> Stmt;
class DbProxy {
private:
  void reset() { resources.clear(); } // all vanish!

  vector<Stmt> resources;
};
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. The library I use (odbc++) only gives me a pointer to the odbc::PreparedStatement so I can't use the first option. The second is interesting, though. –  davka Jan 10 '11 at 16:50
    
If your library doesn't transfer ownership of the odbc::PreparedStatement to you, the second will also not work because both the shared_ptr and the library will think they have ownership. –  Mark B Jan 10 '11 at 16:57
    
@Mark B: not sure - their samples use auto_ptr that deletes the pointer when goes out of scope, so I assume they do transfer the ownership (sort of, anyway, because when I reset the connection the statement belongs to, I get seg. fault when trying to use/delete the statement. So it looks like a shared ownership...) –  davka Jan 10 '11 at 17:17
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I see nothing wrong with this type of approach. This looks like the "Private Implementation" idiom. You can be interested in the details.

my2c

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You might be able to simply copy in a default copy:

void reset() { *this = DbProxy(); }
share|improve this answer
    
this is interesting, but looks a bit brutal, isn't it? Anyway it assumes that I have nothing in the class but those statements. –  davka Jan 10 '11 at 16:47
    
Yes, but what about stmts.reset(new OdbcResources); to just reset the prepared statements to default constructed items? –  Mark B Jan 10 '11 at 17:00
    
@Mark B: yes, this is better –  davka Jan 10 '11 at 17:14
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