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I wrote a function to check whether a word is palindrome or not but "unexpectedly", that function failed quite badly, here it is:

bool isPalindrome (const string& s){
 string reverse = "";
 string original = s;
 for (string_sz i = 0; i != original.size(); ++i){
  reverse += original.back();
  original.pop_back();
 }

 if (reverse == original)
  return true;
 else
  return false;
}

It gives me "string iterator offset out of range error" when you pass in a string with only one character and returns true even if we pass in an empty string (although I know its because of the intialisation of the reverse variable) and also when you pass in an unassigned string for example:

string input;
isPalindrome(input);

Later, I found a better function which works as you would expect:

bool found(const string& s)
{
 bool found = true;
 for (string::const_iterator i = s.begin(), j = s.end() - 1; i < j; ++i, --j) {
  if (*i != *j)
   found = false;
 }
 return found;
}

Unlike the first function, this function correctly fails when you give it an unassigned string variable or an empty string and works for single characters and such...

So, good people of stackoverflow please point out to me why the first function is so bad...

Thank You.

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted
for (string_sz i = 0; i != original.size(); ++i) {
    reverse += original.back();
    original.pop_back();
}

original.size() changes as you pop elements off the back. Effectively, you keep incrementing i and decrementing original.size(); they may never be equal.

if (reverse == original)

This will never be true since you've just removed all of the elements from original and added them in reverse order to reverse. original will always be empty at this point.

share|improve this answer
    
ahh good point on (reverse == original), its meant to be (reverse == s) – Moin Jan 10 '11 at 17:05

You're found function could very well rely on the STL std::compare function and on the begin()/end() rbegin()/rend() functions of the string. and could be a one line function :

return std::equal(s.begin(), s.end(), s.rbegin());

The std::equal() function compares two ranges of the same length.

The begin()/end() functions provide forward iterators while rbegin() provides a reverse iterator, ie an iterator that starts at the end of the string and goes to the beginning.

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This is probably not what you want, but reverse is already implemented as an algorithm in STL:

bool isPalindrome( const std::string & str )
{
   std::string rev( str );
   std::reverse( rev.begin(), rev.end() );
   return str==rev;
}

As @James McNellis points out, this can be further condensed (without needing any algorithm) by constructing the reversed string directly with reverse iterators on the original string:

bool isPalindrome( const std::string & str )
{
   return str == std::string( str.rbegin(), str.rend() );
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Or even shorter: return str == std::string(str.rbegin(), str.rend());? – James McNellis Jan 10 '11 at 16:52
    
@James McNellis: Right :) – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 10 '11 at 18:25

The loop that purports to reverse the string doesn't in fact do so. As you're removing items from the list, you're also incrementing i. In some cases I imagine it's possible for i to skip past the current size and iterate forever.

Instead of your loop, you can use reverse:

std::reverse(original.begin(), original.end());

And then do the rest of the work. It's up to your requirements if an empty string is a palindrome or not.

share|improve this answer

Your solutions are far too complicated ;)

bool is_palindrome(std::string const& s) {
    if (s.empty()) return false; // if this is required.
    return !lexicographical_compare(s.begin(), s.end(), s.rbegin(), s.rend());
}

Edit: Or, as Etienne noted, just use std::equal ...

bool is_palindrome(std::string const& s) {
    if (s.empty()) return false; // if this is required.
    return equal(s.begin(), s.end(), s.rbegin());
}
share|improve this answer

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