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I'm trying to wrap my head around unit testing, and I've encountered a behavior that I'm unsure of:

"Can Backup Inventory"

Basically, the "Inventory" table is copied to the "InventoryHistory" table, and given a time-stamp of when the backup occurred ("HistoryDate").

Here's the code for backing-up inventory:

        DateTime historyDate = DateTime.Now;
        MyDataContext db = new MyDataContext();

        db.GetTable<InventoryHistory>().InsertAllOnSubmit(
            db.GetTable<Inventory>()
                .Select(i => new InventoryHistory
                {
                    ID = i.ID,
                    ItemName = i.ItemName,
                    /* etc, etc, etc */
                    HistoryDate = historyDate

                })
        );

My questions are:

  1. Should/Can this behavior be broken down into smaller unit-testable parts?

  2. Since I am testing against a dedicated test database, should I be using a mocking tool and following the abstract factory pattern for any "repositories"?

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The question I would ask is that is this really a unit test? A unit test would consider mocked Table<TEntity> instances, because we're not concerned with the actual data, rather that the mechanism of creating the items is correct.

In your snippet above, it seems that you are unit testing the Linq methods themselves, not any specific code you have written yourself.

As for your last question, one of the fundamental mistakes made with mocking is the assumption of what to test when mocking. Typically you would be mocking a something consumed by the type you want to test. E.g.:

public ICalculatorService
{
  int Add(int a, int b);
}

[Test]
public void CannAdd()
{
  var mock = Mock<ICalculatorService();
  mock.Setup(m => m.Add(It.IsAny<int>(), It.IsAny<int>()))
      .Returns(100);

  var service = mock.Object;
  Assert(service.Add(1, 2) == 100); // Incorrect
}

The above is a pointless test, because I am testing that it is returning exactly what I have told it to. I'm not testing the Moq framework here, I need to test my code, so I would need to be testing the consumer:

public class Calculator
{
  private readonly ICalculatorService _service;

  public Calculator(ICalculatorService service)
  {
    _service = service;
  }

  public int Add(int a, int b)
  {
    return _service.Add(a, b);
  }
}

[Test]
public void CannAdd()
{
  var mock = Mock<ICalculatorService();
  mock.Setup(m => m.Add(It.IsAny<int>(), It.IsAny<int>()))
      .Returns(100);

  var calculator = new Calculator(mock.Object);
  Assert(calculator.Add(1, 2) == 100); // Correct
}

That's more like it (although a simplistic example). I am now testing the Calculator consumer itself, not the consumable. In your example, even if you were mocking your DataContext to return dummy instances of Table<TEntity>, what real benefits do you get?

Realistically you'd probably create a repository, e.g. an IInventoryRepository, and create a consumer of that repository (could be a domain model, a controller, etc). Then through testing, you'd mock that repository, and test your consumer.

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Thank you, that's very informative, though I'm still a little unclear about this. My summation based on your answer is that the unit-testability of the "Can Backup Inventory" behavior will depend on the context in which it is consumed? It's just a little frustrating since I see "Can Backup Inventory" as a very cut-and-dry behavior, though in terms of unit-testing, it's much more vague. –  Didaxis Jan 10 '11 at 18:30
    
@Eric - Your summation is correct if you needed to mock your data context. The problem is that your particular piece of code is pretty atomic as it is, and to gain any value from unit testing that section of code, you'd need to mock your data context so your test proves that InventoryHistory instances are created for a mock set of Inventory items that exist in your data context. If that is the case, then create a mock of your data context, mock the GetTable<Inventory> table to return your test data, and write your test to prove that the associated history items are created. –  Matthew Abbott Jan 10 '11 at 18:36
    
But again, your left testing the Linq-to-Sql method InsertOnSubmit is correct, and is that in the scope of your unit test? –  Matthew Abbott Jan 10 '11 at 18:37
    
Unit testing a controller calling a repository is done by faking an Interface (if it uses the abstract factory pattern), but how would you go about faking (both stub and mock) an EF data context? –  StuperUser Jan 10 '11 at 23:13
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This looks like a fairly atomic operation to me, not much opportunity for breaking it apart.

Unit testing does not hit the database- that's integration testing. If you want a good unit test for this, you would test for behavior- in this case, that the history is backed up when it's supposed to be.

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Pex and Moles would be good for faking times etc. this. How could you fake the DataContext? –  StuperUser Jan 10 '11 at 23:02
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By way of full disclosure, I'm only just starting to learn EF and LINQ and the best way to test them, so you may get some more useful information regarding them in particular, so these are just general testing answers.

1. I can't see a way that this can be further broken down to be isolated for unit testing, apart from:

ID = i.ID,
ItemName = i.ItemName,
/* etc, etc, etc */
HistoryDate = historyDate

being refactored into a seperate method to be unit tested as the only other code are LINQ calls, which MS are responsible for testing.

2. I don't think you'd be able to introduce a seam to isolate it with the abstract repository factory pattern, since you're calling into a datacontext.

I'm not sure whether you should fake this (and since you'd be testing against it will be a mock proper - a fake that you test against, a fake that you don't test against is a stub) but since it's calling into a test server, you can make it an automated integration test since the functionality involves the interaction with the data store.

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1  
Unit testing involves completely isolating code from the other objects it interacts with. This means that if the code fails, you can be sure that the failure is to do with the code under test. To do this you have to fake these objects. The responsibility of a repository is to call to a DB, it interacts so much with the database that isolating it doesn't give you as much value as testing that it works with the database correctly. –  StuperUser Jul 6 '12 at 9:47
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At first, method you describe looks simply and I'm not sure it needs any unit tests. But, if you want to decompose it, you may do this:

  1. Extract method for getting list of inventories for backup

    IQueryable GetInventoryForBackup(this DataContext context) { return context.GetTable(); }

  2. Extract method to convert Inventory to InventoryHistory

    IEnumerable ToInventoryHistory(this IEnumerable data, DateTime historyDate) { return data.Select(i => new InventoryHistroy { ID = i.Id .... }

  3. Extract method to save sequence of InventoryHistory

    void SaveHistory(IEnumerable data) { dataContext.InsertAllOnSubmit(data); dataContext.SubmitChanges(); }

Now you have seemsful methods and you can easy write unit tests for.

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