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lets say i have this variable :

...
Somekindofobject var = new Somekindofobject();
...

and i want to know where var is located on the heap ( by address , like 0x08 and so on),and to print the address out .

is it possible?

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If all you want to do is print the object, what benefit do you get from knowing where it is on the heap? What are you really trying to accomplish? –  Anon Jan 10 '11 at 20:07
    
@Anon: I think he means print the address out. –  Platinum Azure Jan 10 '11 at 20:08
    
i am working on a program that gets as input java program , and instruments code that prints out to file information about variable access. The only way that i can determine between two fields of objects of the same class is by thier address on heap. Therefore, i need the address on heap –  RanZilber Jan 10 '11 at 20:09
    
One generally instruments Java bytecode with Java bytecode. In this case you don't need "the address". Perhaps there is another/better question lurking here? If need "the address" then the only way I know of is JNI with pinning, but that likely won't work "as you expect" I'm afraid. –  user166390 Jan 10 '11 at 20:18
    
Looks like you need to use a debugging framework, these normally provide some sort of unique object id. –  josefx Jan 10 '11 at 20:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

i am working on a program that gets as input java program , and instruments code that prints out to file information about variable access. The only way that i can determine between two fields of objects of the same class is by thier address on heap. Therefore, i need the address on heap

You can use System.identityHashCode to get a notion of sameness. It's not perfect, but it's pretty good. If you do get the heap address of an object, remember that the JVM is allowed to move objects around (and frequently does when a generational garbage collector promotes a long lived object to an older generation) so the heap location of an object is not a good proxy for identity in all circumstances.

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this probably would solve OP's problem very well on 32 bit systems. –  irreputable Jan 10 '11 at 20:35
    
System.identityHashCode is nowadays is based on a random generator with per thread seed –  bestsss Jan 10 '11 at 20:38
    
can you elaborate ? what does System.idenetityHashCode(var) gives me? I need somthing that will allow me to determine between same field on a diffrent object of a same class. –  RanZilber Jan 10 '11 at 20:38
    
Site crashed and lost the previous answer but to easily track object identities (not equality) IdentityHashMap is what you look for I guess. System.identityHashCode is not stable even in 32bit environments and while unlikely it can collide. Object serialization (java.io.ObjectOutputStream) tracks references with a similar (to identityHashMap) structure. –  bestsss Jan 11 '11 at 2:31
    
Generally speaking if you have just 'objects' you should not use HashMap alikes since they require proper hashCode and equals implementation, deliberately wrongly written equals (+hashcode) can trace quite a few datastructures for the existing. However, all that is out of the scope of the question. –  bestsss Jan 11 '11 at 2:35

You might give a try on this article of javaPaper: Address of a Java object

It's about using the Unsafe class in the sun.misc package to get the address.

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Absolutely scary. Note Unsafe (the name was chosen for a reason) and sun.misc (a "private" implementation-specific package). Also note this is for the logical address and not the physical address. +1 for a interesting article. –  user166390 Jan 10 '11 at 20:23
    
+1 for Unsafe, it's good. –  bestsss Jan 10 '11 at 20:38
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This will give you the address of fields within an object, but not he object itself. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 10 '11 at 21:14

Even if you managed to get the heap address of the object there is no guarantee that by the time you've used it the object is still there. The garbage collector may move the object to another location at any time. Unlike .NET java does not support memory pinning. If you are look to push data into an address from native code a DirectByteBuffer might be what you need.

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Aside mentioned Unsafe which is well... useful (I have used it myself in a production environment). There is another solution which will not return the Java address as native pointer it's called direct java.nio.ByteBuffer, it has been designed with exactly that idea in mind. It allocated memory by direct ByteBuffer is not allocated in the java heap and it's not subject of standard garbage collection. Then, of course, ByteBuffer offers the direct pointer via ByteBuffer.address()

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thats not what i need here , because i dont have any idea about the input code im getting . But i like this idea , so +1; –  RanZilber Jan 10 '11 at 20:50

Given your goals, I think that the only solution is JVMTI. You would associate a unique identifier with each object using the {SetTag} operation. Then listen for {FieldModification} events.

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