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I am trying to implement the next 2 functions

Number& DoubleClass::operator+( Number& x);
Number& IntClass::operator+(Number& x);

I am not sure how to do it..(their unidirectionality is explained below):

   class IntClass;
   class DoubleClass;

class Number {
        //return a Number object that's the results of x+this, when x is either
        //IntClass or DoubleClass
        virtual Number& operator+(Number& x) = 0;
};


class IntClass : public Number {
    private:
        int my_number;
        //return a Number object that's the result of x+this.
        //The actual class of the returned object depends on x.
        //If x is IntClass, then the result if IntClass.
        //If x is DoubleClass, then the results is DoubleClass.
    public:
        Number& operator+(Number& x);
};


class DoubleClass : public Number {
    private:
        double my_number;
    public:

        //return a DoubleClass object that's the result of x+this.
        //This should work if x is either IntClass or DoubleClass
        Number& operator+( Number& x);
};
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I assume IntClass::operator+() was meant to be public, right? –  chrisaycock Jan 10 '11 at 20:17
    
Was something wrong with the explanation you got on your earlier question? –  Ben Voigt Jan 10 '11 at 20:21
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to separate polymorphism from the type being returned. You can do that with encapsulation.

For example:

class Number
{
    class NumberImpl
    {
    public:
        virtual ~NumberImpl(){}
        virtual NumberImpl* add(Number x) const = 0;
    };
    class IntClass;
    class DoubleClass;

    auto_ptr<NumberImpl> pimpl;
    Number(NumberImpl* p) : pimpl(p) {}

    //return a Number object that's the results of x+this, when x is either
    //IntClass or DoubleClass
public:
    Number operator+( const Number& x ) const { return Number(pimpl->add(x)); }
};


class Number::IntImpl : public Number::NumberImpl
{
private:
    int my_number;
public:
    //return a Number object that's the result of x+this.
    //The actual class of the returned object depends on x.
    //If x is IntImpl, then the result is new IntImpl.
    //If x is DoubleImpl, then the results is new DoubleImpl.
    virtual NumberImpl* add(Number& x) const;
};

class Number::DoubleImpl : public Number::NumberImpl
{
private:
    double my_number;
public:
    //return a new DoubleImpl object that's the result of x+this.
    //This should work if x is either IntImplor DoubleImpl
    virtual NumberImpl* add(Number& x) const;
};
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You can’t.

The problem is that operator + returns a new object and you cannot in good conscience return a reference – this would necessarily either be a dangling reference or a reference to unmanaged heap memory that you would have to free manually.

In summary, this cannot be done using the operator +.

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"cannot be done" -- them's fightin' words. It requires a redesign, but is most certainly possible. –  Ben Voigt Jan 10 '11 at 20:22
4  
@Ben: … cannot be done using that interface, without breaking basic assumptions of C++ that would make using the API infernal. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 10 '11 at 20:26
    
@Ben: Scott Meyers, Effective C++, Item 21 (3rd ed)/23 (2nd ed.): "Don't try to return a reference when you must return an object". More than 4 pages with an excellent analysis why operator+ must return an object (rather than a reference). –  sbi Jan 10 '11 at 20:36
2  
@sbi: So return an object. By value. Polymorphism requires that there's a pointer or reference somewhere around, not that the return value is a pointer or reference. See my answer. –  Ben Voigt Jan 10 '11 at 20:37
1  
@Ben - you can't. What would you return? If you can convert any of the derivatives of Number directly into a Number value then those derivatives are doing nothing. If they ARE doing something then converting any one of them to a Number value is going to lose any interesting data that makes them derivatives. –  Crazy Eddie Jan 10 '11 at 21:30
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