Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table where one of the fields can be empty. I'm trying to return only these rows where this field is empty. But I keep getting errors just doing WHERE field = "" ... WHERE field = '' ... WHERE field = null

Any ideas what I'm missing?

share|improve this question
1  
What are you putting in the ...? –  Mark Peters Jan 10 '11 at 21:32
    
I think this illustrates three possible Where statements. –  Fionnuala Jan 10 '11 at 22:05

4 Answers 4

What do you mean by errors?

But, if you want to get just those rows where the fields are empty, attempt something like thus:

SELECT * FROM MyTable WHERE LTRIM(RTRIM(ISNULL(MyField, ''))) = ''
share|improve this answer
    
For Access you would use Nz rather than ISNULL(MyField, ''). IsNull does not take more than one argument. –  Fionnuala Jan 10 '11 at 21:56
    
That's true. Of course, I don't use access, so I tend to forget the specifics on how Access tortures SQL. –  Stephen Wrighton Jan 10 '11 at 22:14
    
All database engines have variations in their SQL dialect. -1 for posting a non-Access answer. –  David-W-Fenton Jan 11 '11 at 23:06
    
good solution, by pre-qualifying a NULL value, turning into an empty string, then trimming both sides guarantees he will be getting a character string for the final = '' test. –  DRapp Mar 10 '11 at 19:28

In SQL, a completely empty field is said to be NULL. For NULL searches you do not use equals (=), but rather the special operator IS NULL:

 SELECT * FROM table WHERE field IS NULL

Access allows you to have not NULL empty fields if you allow empty strings, this is a bad idea as it makes it difficult to distinguish visual between a NULL value and a 0-length string, so I suggest you don't permit it in your database.

share|improve this answer
2  
Space-filled and zero length string are possible, so to cover all bases you can use Trim(field & "")="". –  Fionnuala Jan 10 '11 at 21:58
1  
I'll accept 0-length strings as empty, but personally I wouldn't consider a space-padded string empty. In any event, from the question I'm pretty sure the OPs issue is not identifying different kinds of empty strings, but not knowing the IS NULL operator. –  Larry Lustig Jan 10 '11 at 22:11

Does your query have three WHERE clauses? If so, change the second two to OR

share|improve this answer
SELECT * 
  FROM MyTable 
 WHERE IIF(MyField = ' ', NULL, MyField) IS NULL;

UPDATE: here's a demonstration of how "ANSI padding" works in the Access Database Engine (ACE, Jet, whatever), which somehow seems to be necessary (surely every SQL product in the land works this way...?): just paste into any VBA (Access, Excel, Word, etc) or VB6 module and run (no references etc required): if it is true that a single space is equal to a zero-length string (ZLS) or an 'undetermined' number of spaces then you will see a list of Ys:

Sub Fundamentals()

  On Error Resume Next
  Kill Environ$("temp") & "\DropMe.mdb"
  On Error GoTo 0

  Dim cat
  Set cat = CreateObject("ADOX.Catalog")
  With cat
    .Create _
        "Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;" & _
        "Data Source=" & _
        Environ$("temp") & "\DropMe.mdb"
    With .ActiveConnection

      Dim SQL As String
      SQL = _
      "SELECT IIF(SPACE(0) = SPACE(1), 'Y', 'N')," & vbCr & _
      "       IIF(SPACE(1) = SPACE(1), 'Y', 'N')," & vbCr & _
      "       IIF(SPACE(2) = SPACE(1), 'Y', 'N')," & vbCr & _
      "       IIF(SPACE(3) = SPACE(1), 'Y', 'N')," & vbCr & _
      "       IIF(SPACE(4) = SPACE(1), 'Y', 'N')," & vbCr & _
      "       IIF(SPACE(5) = SPACE(1), 'Y', 'N')," & vbCr & _
      "       IIF(SPACE(55) = SPACE(1), 'Y', 'N')," & vbCr & _
      "       IIF(SPACE(99) = SPACE(1), 'Y', 'N')," & vbCr & _
      "       IIF(SPACE(255) = SPACE(1), 'Y', 'N')," & vbCr & _
      "       IIF(SPACE(4321) = SPACE(1), 'Y', 'N')," & vbCr & _
      "       IIF(SPACE(54321) = SPACE(1), 'Y', 'N')," & vbCr & _
      "       IIF(SPACE(654321) = SPACE(1), 'Y', 'N');"

      .Execute SQL

      Dim rs
      Set rs = .Execute(SQL)
      MsgBox rs.GetString(, , vbCr)
    End With
    Set .ActiveConnection = Nothing
  End With
End Sub

UPDATE2:

Certainly Jet/ACE doesn't pad fields to fixed length!

Incorrect. The Access Database has a fixed width text data type generally known as NCHAR(n) (though other synonym apply) that does indeed pad column values to fixed length...

What data type is NCHAR(10) in the Access table designer?

I don't it will show in the table designer thing correctly. The Access UI still lags behind the Jet 4.0 technology, there are many such omissions. I don't have Access installed at the moment -- perhaps someone could run the following code, open the .mdb in the Access UI and tell us...?

Sub AccessNChar()

  On Error Resume Next
  Kill Environ$("temp") & "\DropMe.mdb"
  On Error GoTo 0

  Dim cat
  Set cat = CreateObject("ADOX.Catalog")
  With cat
    .Create _
        "Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;" & _
        "Data Source=" & _
        Environ$("temp") & "\DropMe.mdb"
    With .ActiveConnection

      Dim Sql As String

      Sql = "CREATE TABLE TestNChar (col1 NCHAR(10));"
      .Execute Sql

      Sql = "INSERT INTO TestNChar (col1) VALUES (SPACE(1));"
      .Execute Sql

      Sql = "SELECT LEN(col1) FROM TestNChar;"

      Dim rs
      Set rs = .Execute(Sql)

      MsgBox rs.GetString
    End With
    Set .ActiveConnection = Nothing
  End With
End Sub
share|improve this answer
    
@Remou: it does indeed check for a ZLS or an undetermined number of spaces. –  onedaywhen Jan 11 '11 at 15:24
    
Huh? How? It seems to me that it's checking for a single space and will return a ZLS or any other number of spaces if the initial IIf() condition does not match. And it's not going to use indexes, so seems to me like a very bad idea. –  David-W-Fenton Jan 11 '11 at 23:08
    
@Davide-W-Fenton and @Remou: you both have MS-Access badges here on SO, this is fundamental stuff! Standard behaviour when comparing two strings for equality is end pad the shorter with space characters. Even if you weren't aware of this (shocking!) or had momentarily forgotten, surely it would be really easy for you to test. In a community such as this, I expect you to test my code anyhow, peer review and all that. But I suppose I'll have to post my proof as really easy to run code (assuming you have the courtesy to be bothered to run it!) –  onedaywhen Jan 12 '11 at 9:28
    
@David-W-Fenton: see example VBA code. –  onedaywhen Jan 12 '11 at 9:36
    
I was not aware of this, and find it a not useful thing. I have never run onto it because I don't allow spaces to be stored in my data tables. If all databases behave this way, I'd say they are wrong, since there is no index-using way to search for a field with a single space in it. And certainly, if you're allowing the storage of spaces in your data field, it must mean something, and one space must mean something different from two. Call me an idiot if you like, but this seems like an artifact of ancient dBase-style data storage. Certainly Jet/ACE doesn't pad fields to fixed length! –  David-W-Fenton Jan 18 '11 at 23:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.