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I have a little problem picking the right language to write my daemon, I am confused between C and C++, I want to use C++ because it is more expanded than C, but I want to use C because it is the starting point of everything in linux,

I want to go for C++ as I have many resources about it, so, does it make any difference if I pick C++ instead of C?

and what I will have good if I learn C more? I feel like if I go into C++ I will cover C within C++...

Regards

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14  
Which language do you know better? –  Billy ONeal Jan 10 '11 at 21:43
2  
If you don't already know C, do yourself a favor and don't go with C++. If you already know C, do yourself a favor and go with it. –  Jon Jan 10 '11 at 21:47
    
I know both actually, but not that much to allow me to write a daemon, I need this for a research project in the college, so I need to decide what to go for so I can get into it more deeply –  Bluescrod Jan 10 '11 at 21:50
    
ok, so I understand from your comment Billy, that C is recommended above C++ in all cases? –  Bluescrod Jan 10 '11 at 21:51
    
A daemon can be written in any language, Bluscrod. Choose whatever works for you. –  Xepoch Jan 10 '11 at 21:53
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9 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I can answer this one entirely in code. Writing a daemon roughly consists of doing this:

/*
 * Daemon Initialisation:
 * 1. Fork()
 * 2. setsid()
 * 3. Fork() do we need to do this twice?
 * 4. Chdir /
 * 5. Umask(0)
 * 6. Close STDIN/OUT/ERR
 * 7. Optionally re-open stuff.
 *
 * Refs:
 * 1. http://www.faqs.org/faqs/unix-faq/programmer/faq/
 * 2. http://www.netzmafia.de/skripten/unix/linux-daemon-howto.html
 * 3. http://www.enderunix.org/docs/eng/daemon.php
 */

/* Variables */
/* Our process ID and Session ID */

pid_t pid, sid;
int fd = 0;

/* Fork off the parent process */
pid = fork();
if (pid < 0)
{
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}
/* If we got a good PID, then
 * we can exit the parent process.
 */
if (pid > 0)
{
    exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

/* Create a new SID for the child process */
sid = setsid();

if (sid < 0)
{
    /* Log the failure */
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

/* Fork off the parent process, again */
pid = fork();
if (pid < 0)
{
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}
/* If we got a good PID, then
   we can exit the parent process. */
if (pid > 0)
{
    exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

/* Change the current working directory */
if ((chdir("/")) < 0)
{
    /* Log the failure */
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

/* Change the file mode mask */
umask(0);

/* Close all file descriptors */

for (fd = getdtablesize(); fd >= 0; --fd)
{
    close(fd);
}

/* Open standard file descriptors from
 * elsewhere.
 * e.g. /dev/null -> stdin.
 *      /dev/console -> stderr?
 *      logfile as stdout?
 */
fd = open("/dev/null", O_RDWR); /* open stdin */
dup(fd); /* stdout */
dup(fd); /* stderr */

These are all C function calls, but of course, you can call them from C++.

The reason I have this code sat around is because it's actually a function I pass function pointers to which executes my "daemon body". Why do I do it this way? To work out where my errors are running the code directly as a process (if necessary with root privs) then I "daemonise". It's quite hard to debug a daemon process otherwise...

Edit: of course, using function pointers is a C way of thinking, but there's no reason you can't implement some form of class-based mechanism.

So, honestly, it really doesn't matter. Pick whichever you prefer.

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Yeah, but can you pass it any object invokable as a function? –  Crazy Eddie Jan 10 '11 at 22:01
    
@Noah No, because I use it in C only. I only posted it to point out there's nothing in writing a daemon that prevents you from using C++. This could quite easily be a method in a class to which you pass objects, or just a method to which you pass objects. I'm sure there are many clever C++ ways of doing this. –  Ninefingers Jan 10 '11 at 22:03
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as far as I'm concerned, C++ is C with optional extras. So go with that, and use whatever bits and pieces you feel comfortable with.

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Unless "optional extras" is supposed to be "a large array of whole paradigms": You fail, sir. C is a fine language for system programming. C++ is a large language for general purpose programming with quite a few nasty edges inherited from C. That hypothetical language which goes by names like "C with classes" or "C/C++" is a mess. –  delnan Jan 10 '11 at 21:52
1  
why? what's wrong with using a c++ compiler and writing everything procedurally, except for (say) std::string or std::list - there's not much difference there compared to using your own list or string handling functions. You certainly don't have to fill it with inherited classes and whatnot if you don't want to. –  gbjbaanb Jan 11 '11 at 19:00
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Unless you are planning on doing kernel development or embedded programming, learning C++ is strictly better than learning C. The only thing you need to be careful of is that C++ "mangles" its function names, so that your function void foo() in C++ will not be accessible directly by a C program. The trick is to declare it with C linkage, as in extern "C" void foo().

That said, C++ is a much bigger language than C, and it will definitely take more time to learn.

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C++ mangles its function names, unless you use "extern C" around them. For internal-only functions, the mangling is not a big deal. –  gbjbaanb Jan 11 '11 at 19:02
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There is no reason to choose C instead of C++ if you are more comfortable with C++, and vice versa. They are both equally capable languages for this task.

Unless you are looking to become more comfortable with C, just use what you know.

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Use whichever language you know best right now.

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Use C++ only if you are convinced that its additional features can ease the development. Don't go for C++ if you only intend to swap printf for cout and struct for class. Doing so you're basically writing in the same language but using a less advanced compiler.

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You should definitely use C++.

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You should definitely use C, period.

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I suppose it's a joke. Perhaps even educational as comments. But has no business being an answer, sorry. –  delnan Jan 10 '11 at 22:09
    
This answer could use some expansion, but I don't think it's a joke. –  R.. Jan 11 '11 at 1:16
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Use neither C nor C++, they are not really required for general programming.

Use a high-level language that makes thing easy, such as Python

Of course it depends what kind of "daemon" you're writing, but in all likelihood, you want to be focusing your development effort on the task in hand, not fixing things like memory leaks, string handling or other distractions. Using neither C or (to a lesser extent) C++ will allow you to do this.

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FUD: "fixing things like memory leaks, string handling or other distractions" –  d-_-b Sep 23 '13 at 7:20
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