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I'm trying to find a good way to collect the names of classes defined in the stylesheets included with a given document. I know about document.StyleSheetList but it doesn't seem like it'd be easy to parse. What I'm looking for is something like, for a stylesheet document such as:

.my_class { 
    background: #fff000; 
}
.second_class {
    color: #000000;
}

I could extract an array like ["my_class", "second_class"]. This obviously assumes the favorable scenario of a fully loaded dom and stylesheets.

I've been looking everywhere for a good way to do something like this and so far, have made little progress. Does anyone have any idea about how to pull this off? Thanks!

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Are you looking for something that will work in all browsers, or is this just for development? –  Prestaul Jan 10 '11 at 21:45
    
By "CSS classes" do you mean "All selectors regardless of any mention of an HTML class", "Selectors that include class selectors", "The bits of selectors that are class selectors" or something else? –  Quentin Jan 10 '11 at 21:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This will show all rules defined in the stylesheets.

var allRules = [];
var sSheetList = document.styleSheets;
for (var sSheet = 0; sSheet < sSheetList.length; sSheet++)
{
    var ruleList = document.styleSheets[sSheet].cssRules;
    for (var rule = 0; rule < ruleList.length; rule ++)
    {
       allRules.push( ruleList[rule].selectorText );
    }
}

The thing, though, is that it includes all rules regardless of being class or tag or id or whatever..

You will need to explain in more detail what you want to happen for non class rules (or combined rules)

share|improve this answer
    
I actually implemented something quite similar in the end (available here: gist.github.com/774111). –  Fred Oliveira Jan 12 '11 at 21:04
2  
@Fred, just glanced over your code in github.. For the defined classes you need to account for .class1.class2, tag.class and #id.class cases.. For the unused be careful because some classes might be used from javascript (events etc..) so they will not be in the DOM when you check the DOM (if that case is important to you..) –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Jun 22 '11 at 13:13

You were on track with document.styleSheets (https://developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/document.styleSheets)

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/stylesheet.cssRules

Here's a quick and dirty method to output all class selectorTexts to the console in Firefox + Firebug.

    var currentSheet = null;
    var i = 0;
    var j = 0;
    var ruleKey = null;

    //loop through styleSheet(s)
    for(i = 0; i<document.styleSheets.length; i++){
        currentSheet = document.styleSheets[i];

        ///loop through css Rules
        for(j = 0; j< currentSheet.cssRules.length; j++){

            //log selectorText to the console (what you're looking for)
            console.log(currentSheet.cssRules[j].selectorText);

            //uncomment to output all of the cssRule contents
            /*for(var ruleKey in currentSheet.cssRules[j] ){
                 console.log(ruleKey +': ' + currentSheet.cssRules[j][ruleKey ]);
            }*/
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
When I do this I get: SecurityError: The operation is insecure. for(j = 0; j< currentSheet.cssRules.length; j++){ –  user9645 Nov 5 '13 at 19:22

This is probably not something you you really want to be doing except as part of a refactoring process, but here is a function that should do what you want:

function getClasses() {
    var classes = {};
    // Extract the stylesheets
    return Array.prototype.concat.apply([], Array.prototype.slice.call(document.styleSheets)
        .map(function (sheet) {
            // Extract the rules
            return Array.prototype.concat.apply([], Array.prototype.slice.call(sheet.cssRules)
                .map(function(rule) {
                    // Grab a list of classNames from each selector
                    return rule.selectorText.match(/\.[\w\-]+/g) || [];
                })
            );
        })
    ).filter(function(name) {
        // Reduce the list of classNames to a unique list
        return !classes[name] && (classes[name] = true);
    });
}
share|improve this answer

What about

.something .other_something?

Do you want a pool of classNames that exist? Or a pool of selectors?

Anyway, have you tried iterating through document.styleSheets[i].cssRules? It gives you the selector text. Parsing that with some regexp kungfu should be easier...

Do you need it to be crossbrowser?

share|improve this answer
    
I actually did use document.styleSheets[].cssRules in my implementation, but kinda assumed there'd be some other way (I actually mistakenly thought jQuery included this functionality - I might as well contribute it now that I went through it, though). –  Fred Oliveira Jan 12 '11 at 21:02

You can accompish this with jQuery. Example would be

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.4/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script>
  $(document).ready(function(){
      var allobjects = $("*")
  });
</script>

Check out the jQuery website: http://api.jquery.com/all-selector/

share|improve this answer
2  
This will grab all the HTML elements in a document. It won't say anything about the stylesheet. –  Quentin Jan 10 '11 at 21:51
    
I very much like this answer. Not sure why the down-vote. You can pop all document objects into an array and read their classes... The OP stated classes defined in the stylesheets included with a given document so you need to first get the elements to decide which classes are used in the document. –  Dutchie432 Jan 10 '11 at 21:53
    
Oh I see the confusion. OP is trying to read the styles in all included stylesheets, not the classes in all document objects. Vaguely worded. –  Dutchie432 Jan 10 '11 at 21:56
    
My bad with the wording - I do want the selectors defined in stylesheets included in/or linked to from the document. I ended up going with traversing the document.styleSheets array. –  Fred Oliveira Jan 12 '11 at 21:03

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