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In the following function, if I take out the '.prototype' part the function ceases to work.

imageClock.display.prototype.update = function() {
 var dateObj = new Date();
 var currentTime = dateObj.getHours() + ":" + dateObj.getMinutes() + ":" + dateObj.getSeconds();
 var currentTimeHTML = imageClock.imageHTML(currentTime) + '<img src="' + ((dateObj.getHours() >=12) ? imageClock.digits[11] : imageClock.digits[10]) + '" />';
 document.getElementById(this.spanId).innerHTML = currentTimeHTML;
}

What I don't understand is that I'm not using the prototype framework as part of my code. The only file my html file is linking to is the javascript file containing this code. (full code below; name of the file is clock3.js inside a folder called 'javascript', which is the only javascript file my html file points/links to.)

var imageClock = new Object();

imageClock.digits = ["images/clock/0.gif", "images/clock/1.gif", "images/clock/2.gif", "images/clock/3.gif", "images/clock/4.gif", "images/clock/5.gif", "images/clock/6.gif", "images/clock/7.gif", "images/clock/8.gif", "images/clock/9.gif", "images/clock/am.gif", "images/clock/pm.gif", "images/clock/colon.gif"];

imageClock.instances = 0;

var preLoadImages = [];

// preloads javascript images
for (var i = 0; i < imageClock.digits.length; i++) {
 preLoadImages[i] = new Image();
 preLoadImages[i].src = imageClock.digits[i];
}

imageClock.imageHTML = function(timeString) {
 var sections = timeString.split(":");

 // makes the hour digit either 12pm or 1pm depending on what time it is so that 0am or 13pm doesn't appear
 if (sections[0] == "0") {
  sections[0] = "12";
 } else if (sections[0] >= 13) {
  sections[0] = sections[0] - 12 + "";
 }
 for (var i = 0; i < sections.length; i++) {
  if (sections[i].length == 1) {
   sections[i] = '<img src="' + imageClock.digits[0] + '" />' + '<img src="' + imageClock.digits[parseInt(sections[i])] + '" />';
  } else {
   sections[i] = '<img src="' + imageClock.digits[parseInt(sections[i].charAt(0))] + '" />' + '<img src="' + imageClock.digits[parseInt(sections[i].charAt(1))] + '" />';
  } 
 }

 // section[0] indicates hours, the image tag is the colons, sections[1] indicates the second part which is the minutes, and sections[2] indicates seconds. delete sections[2] and the seconds part of the clock will disappear.
 return sections[0] + '<img src="' + imageClock.digits[12] + '" />' + sections[1] + '<img src="' + imageClock.digits[12] + '" />' + sections[2];
}

imageClock.display = function() {
 var clockInstance = this;
 this.spanid = "clockSpan" + (imageClock.instances++);
 document.write('<span id = "' + this.spanId + '"></span>');
 this.update();
 setInterval(function() {clockInstance.update()}, 1000);
}

imageClock.display.prototype.update = function() {
 var dateObj = new Date();
 var currentTime = dateObj.getHours() + ":" + dateObj.getMinutes() + ":" + dateObj.getSeconds();
 var currentTimeHTML = imageClock.imageHTML(currentTime) + '<img src="' + ((dateObj.getHours() >=12) ? imageClock.digits[11] : imageClock.digits[10]) + '" />';
 document.getElementById(this.spanId).innerHTML = currentTimeHTML;
}

and the html file using this javascript code to display a simple clock is as follows

<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript" src="javascript/clock3.js"></script>
<title>Javascript Clock</title>
</head>
<body>
<h1>The Current Time:</h1>
<p><script type="text/javascript">new imageClock.display();</script></p>
</body>
</html>

As you can see I have not included the prototype framework, and I don't understand why the code stops working when I take out the '.prototype' part

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The word "prototype" is used in at least two interesting ways in the Javascript world:

  • It's the name of a popular framework (Prototype)
  • It's the name of the property on Function instances used by the runtime for locating "inherited" properties of object instances

The "prototype" attribute of a Function instance is what's involved here. It has nothing at all to do with the Prototype framework.

When your code adds a property to the "prototype" object of a Function instance (here, the "display" function, which itself is referenced by a property of your "imageClock" object), it ensures that object instances constructed by calling

new imageClock.display(/* whatever */)

will all have an "update" function available (as per your code). Your code uses that fact in that timer handler.

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The prototype property has nothing to do with the Prototype framework.

The prototype property is an integral part of Javascript; it isn't an optional keyword.
See the documentation

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The prototype you refer to here is nothing at all to do with the (very poorly named IMO) javascript library "Prototype".

The Javascript language uses prototype based inheritance (as opposed to Class based inheritance, as many people would be accustomed). You can read more about it on wikipedia.

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