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After testing on msvc8, I found:

  1. Parse GetCommandLine() to argc and argv
  2. Standard C Library initialization
  3. C++ Constructor of global variables

These three things are called before entering main().

My questions are:

  1. Will this execution order be different when I porting my program to different compiler (gcc or armcc), or different platform?
  2. What stuff does Standard C Library initialization do? So far I know setlocale() is a must.
  3. Is it safe to call standard C functions inside C++ constructor of global variables?
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what are you trying to do? the library initialzation also create a few buffer for some functions (e.g. buffer for iostream). There are too many miscellaneous tasks to list. –  J-16 SDiZ Jan 11 '11 at 0:01
    
Why would the orders matter? –  Student T Jan 11 '11 at 0:04
    
What runs before main? Whatever it's chasing. –  Crazy Eddie Jan 11 '11 at 0:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

1: Will this execution order be different when I porting my program to different compiler (gcc or armcc), or different platform?

Yes.

2: What stuff does Standard C Library initialization do? So far I know setlocale() is a must.

I am sure there is other stuff. You should not rely on any global objects util after main has started. This means things like std streams (std::cin, std::cout) may not be usable.

3: Is it safe to call standard C functions inside C++ constructor of global variables?

Probably not.

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1  
@ephemient: Probably safe. But probably not a good idea. These streams use the locale another global variable but its value may or may not be the current locale or "C". The unspecified order is not a real problem (if you know it exists (Its just an annoyance that can be worked around (it is a problem if you don;t know it exists))). –  Loki Astari Jan 11 '11 at 0:38

Here's an article from the LSB (Linux Standard Base) effort describing what __libc_start_main might do on Linux.

Specifically:

* performing any necessary security checks if the effective user
  ID is not the same as the real user ID.
* initialize the threading subsystem.
* registering the rtld_fini to release resources when this dynamic
  shared object exits (or is unloaded).
* registering the fini handler to run at program exit.
* calling the initializer function (*init)().
* calling main() with appropriate arguments.
* calling exit() with the return value from main().

And here's a more detailed explanation.

This is definitely different to Windows.

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And that's not even getting into what the C++ runtime library does! –  ephemient Jan 11 '11 at 0:30
1  
Being a C++ user hurts my head enough, without trying to look at an implementation of the C++ runtime library... –  Ninefingers Jan 11 '11 at 0:33

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