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Declaring a function that return a 2D array in a header file?

I am trying to have a simple getter function for a 2D array, and I can't seem to figure out the correct syntax to send it.

Currently, I have the following:

class Sample
{   
public:
    char **get2D();

private:
    static const int x = 8;
    static const int y = 10;
    char two_d[x][y];
};


char** Sample::get2D()
{
    return  two_d;
};
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marked as duplicate by Johannes Schaub - litb, James McNellis, Ben Voigt, FredOverflow, Graviton Jan 11 '11 at 11:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

An array of arrays is different from an array of pointers to arrays. In your case, you can't return the correct type without the width of your array (y) being published in your public interface. Without that, the compiler doesn't know how wide each row of the returned array is.

You could try the following:

class Sample
{   
public:
    static const int x = 8;
    static const int y = 10;
    typedef char Row[y];
    Row *get2D();

private:
    char two_d[x][y];
};
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Far better would be to do this:

const char& operator()(int x1, int y1)
{
  // Better to throw an out-of-bounds exception, but this is illustrative.
  assert (x1 < x);
  assert (y1 < y);
  return two_d[x][y];
};

This allows you safe read-only access to your array internals (checkable!).

share|improve this answer
    
And even better would be to just use the Boost Matrix library! boost.org/doc/libs/1_36_0/libs/numeric/ublas/doc/matrix.htm –  EmeryBerger Jan 11 '11 at 1:00
    
+1, although I don't agree it's better to throw exception. You should do both. Assert, then exception. Exceptions are hard to trace back to throw point. Asserts generally trigger some implementaiton defined break point to enter with the debugger. –  Crazy Eddie Jan 11 '11 at 1:02

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