Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a controller that inherits from a class with a beforeInterceptor.

Here is my base class.

class FooBase {
    def beforeInterceptor = [action: {parentInterceptor()}]

    def parentInterceptor() {
        render("Snarge")
    }
}

Here is the version of the controller that does not work.

class BrokenController extends FooBase
{
    def beforeInterceptor = [action: {childInterceptor()}]

    def childInterceptor() {
        super.beforeInterceptor.action.call()
        render("Bar")
    }

    def index = {
        render("Foo")
    }
}

Here is a version that does work

class WorkingController extends FooBase
{
    def beforeInterceptor = {
        super.beforeInterceptor.action.call()
        render("Bar")
    }

    def index = {
        render("Foo")
    }
}

When I call index on WorkingController, I get the output SnargeBarFoo. When I call index on BrokenController I get an IllegalAccessError

I suppose I have a version that works, so my question is more about what is going on here? Why can one version access the parent class from the child class, but the other cannot?

The use case I'm looking for is being able to use the interceptor functions with the except functionality. That requires being able to chain interceptors when they are implemented using a map.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

There is a difference between

this.

and

this.&

the following code works - check the third line:

class BrokenController extends FooBase
{
    def beforeInterceptor = [action: {this&childInterceptor()}]

    def childInterceptor() {
        super.beforeInterceptor.action.call()
        render("Bar")
    }

    def index = {
        render("Foo")
    }
}

The documentation states the following aboit this.&

Method Reference     .&      Get a reference to a method, can be useful for creating closures from methods 

So I am not sure, but I guess it has something todo with the scope the method is invoked in. Maybe the system creates some kind of helper class in order to execute a closure which results in this class not having the super.beforeInterceptor method.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.