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I have something like this:

<p>
  <b>Tags:</b>
  <%if @post.tags.count > 0%>
    <%= @post.tags.collect {|c| (link_to c.name, c)}.join(", ")%>
  <%else%>
    Does not have any tags.
  <%end%>
</p>

Which gives me

Tags: <a href="/tags/1">Java</a>, <a href="/tags/2">CSS</a>

Instead of Java and CSS links. What am I missing?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's because strings in Rails 3 are, by default, not considered HTML-safe. See this blog post about it.

You can manually mark something as safe by calling .html_safe on it, which would make your code like so:

<p>
  <b>Tags:</b>
  <%if @post.tags.count > 0%>
    <%= @post.tags.collect {|c| (link_to c.name, c)}.join(", ").html_safe %>
  <%else%>
    Does not have any tags.
  <%end%>
</p>

But I'd recommend doing this instead:

<p>
  <b>Tags:</b>
  <% if @post.tags.count > 0%>
    <% @post.tags.each_with_index do |tag, i| %>
      <%= link_to h(tag.name), tag %><%= ', ' if i < @post.tags.size - 1 %>
    <% end %>
  <% else %>
    Does not have any tags.
  <%end%>
</p>
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I think html_safe is what you are looking for! So this would solve the problem (@post.tags.collect {|c| (link_to c.name, c)}.join(", ")).html_safe

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I think your tag names should be input by the user, right?

In this case, html_safe is not your first choice, as it gave full trust to the user. And your site would encounter XSS attacks.

The better choice should be sanitize. See the reference here: http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionView/Helpers/SanitizeHelper.html

As you only want to have links, the following line do what you want:

<%= sanitize @post.tags.collect {|c| (link_to strip_links(c.name), c)}.join(", "), :tags => %w(a) %>

Note the use of strip_links(c.name), this removes all the links that input by the user.

Let's assume the tag names are: ["Product", "hi", "bye"]

By just using .html_safe, the following would be shown:

<a href="/tags/1">Product</a>, <a href="/tags/2"><strong>hi</strong></a>, <a href="/tags/3"><a href='bad_site.com'>bye</a></a>

But using the mix of sanitize with strip_links, the following is the result:

<a href="/tags/1">Product</a>, <a href="/tags/2">&lt;strong&gt;hi&lt;/strong&gt;</a>, <a href="/tags/3">bye</a>

Or you could mix the use of strip_tags with .html_safe:

<%= @post.tags.collect {|c| (link_to strip_tags(c.name), c)}.join(", ").html_safe %>

This simply removes all tags in c.name before you call the html_safe.

I would suggest (and you probably are doing already :D) removing all unwanted tags before storing into the database.

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I would actually suggest not stripping tags before putting the user input in the database. How do you know where this is going to be shown? Maybe it'll be sent via HTML, but maybe it'll also be sent over a JSON API and displayed on an iPhone app. Each display medium has unique security considerations, and the point at which you store the data is not the time to account for everything you might ever do with that data. –  Brian Donovan Jan 11 '11 at 19:24
    
Yes, I agree that storing what the user actually input into the database have its advantages. But for normal use, the user should enter the tag name only. It's some kind of ridiculous to show a tag cloud, where most of the tags have unexpected HTML tags inside. A clear tag cloud with custom sizing function should be better, instead of user-input strong, em or even font tags! It does not matter where you display (iphone, desktop app, or any where), you just don't expect the user would enter HTML tags for their tag name. –  PeterWong Jan 12 '11 at 2:45

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