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Consider

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    /*
    hello
    5
    hel
    3
    */
    char a[] = "hello";
    std::cout << a << std::endl;
    std::cout << strlen(a) << std::endl;
    a[3] = 0;
    std::cout << a << std::endl;
    std::cout << strlen(a) << std::endl;

    /*
    hello
    5
    hel o
    5
    */
    std::string b = "hello";
    std::cout << b << std::endl;
    std::cout << b.length() << std::endl;
    b[3] = 0;
    std::cout << b << std::endl;
    std::cout << b.length() << std::endl;

    getchar();

}

I expect std::string will behave identical to char array a. That's it, insert null character in the middle of the string, will "terminate" the string. However, it is not the case. Is my expectation wrong?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

A std::string is not like a usual C string, and can contain embedded NUL characters without problems. However, if you do this you will notice the string is prematurely terminated if you use the .c_str() function to return a const char *.

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I expect std::string will behave identical to char array a.

Why? Nothing in the documentation, anywhere, having to do with std::string says it does this.

My suggestion, stop treating like C++ as C plus some stuff.

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@Lou is right: don't do that. Instead, do this:

b.erase (3, b.length());
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No - std::strings are not NUL-terminated like C "strings"; the std::string records its length independently.

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Yes, your expectation is wrong. std::string is meant to be different from C strings (e.g. not necessarily stored in consecutive memory / an array).

To duplicate the first section's behavior, try std::cout << b.c_str() instead of std::cout << b.

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1  
Can't we finally give up on the theory that anyone is ever going to implement string with non-contiguous storage? C++0x brings it in line with vector. –  Steve Jessop Jan 11 '11 at 3:07
    
With that comment, you might just provoke somebody into actually doing it. –  foo Jan 11 '11 at 3:22

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