Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
var objectTest=
{
    test1:  function( )
    {
       val1 = 1;
    },

    // hows accessing the 
    test2:  function( )
    {
       alert( val1 );
    }
};

objectTest.test2( );
share|improve this question
    
are you saying that it is accessing it? –  Stefan H Jan 11 '11 at 3:32
    
This question is not clear at all. –  Pointy Jan 11 '11 at 3:39
    
did you give up on this? –  Rudu Feb 7 '11 at 17:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

By not using the prefix var the variable is put in different (global) scope try instead:

test1: function() {
 var val1=1;
},

As @Pekka points out, your example (above) requires the calling of objectTest.test1(); first (to create val1) otherwise you'll get an error. If you want to access the variable from both places, then you should rather be using an object-property (like @patrick dw suggests) which doesn't add to the global scope

objectTest.test1();
objectTest.test2(); //Shows: Alert-1
alert(val1); //Shows: Alert-1
val1=2;
objectTest.test(2); //Shows: Alert-2
share|improve this answer
    
But how will this make val1 local to test2()? –  Pekka 웃 Jan 11 '11 at 3:32
    
Pekka! LTNS. Is that what he's asking? –  Rudu Jan 11 '11 at 3:34

It can't. Two functions can't run at the same time, so sharing local scope is impossible the way you show. You would have to define val1 as a member of the object.

share|improve this answer

Depends on what you ultimately want to do. You could make it a public member of the object:

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/wqr6W/

var objectTest=
{
    val1: 'someDefault',
    test1:  function( )
    {
       this.val1 = 1;
    },

    // hows accessing the 
    test2:  function( )
    {
       alert( this.val1 );
    }
};
objectTest.test1( );
objectTest.test2( );

This of course changes your original code. What you actually need to do will depend on your circumstance.

Or this:

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/wqr6W/1/

var objectTest=
{
    val1: 'someDefault',
    test1:  function( )
    {
       this.val1 = 1;
    },

    // hows accessing the 
    test2:  function( )
    {
       this.test1();
       alert( this.val1 );
    }
};
objectTest.test2( );
share|improve this answer

Adding another answer in order to more directly answer the question.

If you are actually talking about a local variable to a function, the simple answer is that you can not access it unless you pass a function out of the function that has the variable, which makes reference to the variable.

This is called creating a closure.

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/csd3s/

var objectTest=
{
    test1:  function( )
    {
       var val1 = 1;
       return {getVal:function() {
           return val1;
       }};
    },

    // hows accessing the 
    test2:  function( )
    {
       alert( this.test1().getVal() );
    }
};

objectTest.test2( );

So inside test2 you can call the test1() function, which returns an object that contains a function, which references the local variable.

That (or something similar) is what it takes to reference an otherwise non-accessible local variable in a function.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.