Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

If I have

<table>
    <tr>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
</table>

and

table
    { width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Each cell takes up an equal quarter of the table, and the table stretches to fit the window.

How can I prevent these table cells from resizing themselves to fit the content within the cells (while still fitting the table's container)?

Thanks

share|improve this question
up vote 14 down vote accepted

You could try table-layout:fixed; - this sets the layout to a certain fixed size (specified in CSS) and ignores the content of the cells, so the width of the cell never changes. I'm not sure if this affects vertical layout or not.

More info on w3schools.

share|improve this answer
1  
You're right -- it works on horizontal widths but not vertical. I feel like CSS is useless for even the simplest of things. I'm just trying to make a calendar! – Nick Jan 11 '11 at 17:55
3  
Any solution for vertical? – Roman Gaufman Sep 24 '12 at 11:41
    
@RomanGaufman I think that my answer to this question works for vertical as well. – ChrisW Jul 2 '13 at 15:38

td{ width:50%; } will work until the table gets small enough.

share|improve this answer
    
What if I don't know the number of rows or columns in advance? I've been using Javascript to give each cell a percentage width and height but can no longer do this. – Nick Jan 11 '11 at 5:45
    
I can't think of a pure HTML/CSS solution, you will probably need Javascript. You could try playing with the CSS overflow property. – Jake Jan 11 '11 at 5:52

You could try to pick a single cell to chew up all the space and set that to 100% height and width:

<table>
    <tr>
        <td>Hi There.</td>
        <td>x</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Here is some text.</td>
        <td class="space-hog"></td>
    </tr>
</table>

and some CSS:

table {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}
td {
    white-space: nowrap;
}
td.space-hog {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}

And a live example. You need to be careful to avoid unpleasant line wrapping when .space-hog does its thing, hence the white-space: nowrap. If you put the .space-hog in the last row then you can avoid pushing the interesting parts down.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not trying to get one cell to take up all the space -- I want ever cell to be equal in width and height regardless of content. – Nick Jan 11 '11 at 17:53
    
Okay, it wasn't clear to me. I don't think there is a way to say "make all these things the same size" in CSS, you have to say "make all these things Wpx wide and Hpx tall" and compute the dimensions yourself on the server or in JavaScript. Maybe supply more context in the question and someone might come up with a whole new approach that avoids table sizing kludges entirely. – mu is too short Jan 11 '11 at 18:20

You can do it by using position: absolute on the content of each table cell: because if you do then the size of the content doesn't affect the size of the cell.

To do this, you must then also position the table cells (so that absolute positioning of the content is relative to the table cell) -- and/or, to support Firefox, position an extra div within the table cells since Firefox doesn't let you apply position to the cells themselves.

For example, I'm using this HTML:

<td><div class="bigimg"><img src="...."/></div></td>

Together with the following CSS, so that the size of the image doesn't affect the size of the cell which contains it:

div.bigimg
{
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    position: relative;
}
div.bigimg > img
{
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
}

I set the height and width of div.bigimg to 100% to match the size of the td which contains it, because I'm using JavaScript to resize the images at run time to fit their containers, which are the div.bigimg.

share|improve this answer

Something along the lines of using overflow:hidden; perhaps?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.