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Given a multistring returned by a function I'm accessing using ctypes of the form:

"the quick brown fox\x00jumped over the lazy\00programmer\00\00"

What's the best way to turn this into a python list like this:

["the quick brown fox", "jumped over the lazy", "programmer"]

I tried using foo.split('\x00'), but that did not work.

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1  
This is really odd. Using raw strings doesn't help, btw, which is why this beats me. –  Rafe Kettler Jan 11 '11 at 5:29
1  
foo.split() returns a new string and does not modify foo, so you may need to write foo=foo.split('\x00') –  John La Rooy Jan 11 '11 at 7:47
    
What do you want out of "\0foo\0\0bar\0\0" ? Do two of \0 together terminate the multistring? –  John Machin Jan 11 '11 at 9:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using filter would be an elegant way to solve this.

>>> s = "the quick brown fox\x00jumped over the lazy\00programmer\00\00"  
>>> filter(None, s.split('\x00'))  
['the quick brown fox', 'jumped over the lazy', 'programmer']
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What's the trick to adding a code snippet and having it formatted correctly? I used the "add code here" button but it still didn't work. –  Bryan Jan 11 '11 at 7:21
    
@Bryan: 4 spaces in front of the code. :) –  Sasha Chedygov Jan 11 '11 at 7:25
    
@musicfreak: thanks... yet another wiki syntax I need to learn :( –  Bryan Jan 11 '11 at 7:28
    
To use the 'code' button, type in the code, select it and then press the button. –  Karl Knechtel Jan 11 '11 at 9:31
    
Thanks for all the suggestions - several of them worked, but the filter() version is the one that got checked in. I think the fact I am using ctypes complicates things. This is a string buffer returned by a call to <some outside library>: –  Andy Jan 13 '11 at 5:13

Given

sentence = "the quick brown fox\x00jumped over the lazy\00programmer\00\00"
[phrase for phrase in sentence.split("\x00") if phrase != ""]

EDIT
Straight from the horse's mouth:

>>> sentence = "the quick brown fox\x00jumped over the lazy\00programmer\00\00"
>>> [phrase for phrase in sentence.split('\x00') if phrase != ""]
['the quick brown fox', 'jumped over the lazy', 'programmer']

Python 2.6.1 (r261:67515, Jul  9 2009, 14:20:26) 
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In this case, simply "if phrase" will work, as strings are True iff nonempty. –  DSM Jan 11 '11 at 7:40
    
True. Just being verbose for the OP. –  sberry Jan 11 '11 at 7:53
>>> s = "the quick brown fox\x00jumped over the lazy\00programmer\00\00"
>>> s.strip('\x00').split('\x00')
['the quick brown fox', 'jumped over the lazy', 'programmer']
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