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I've had quite a bit of trouble trying to write a function that checks if a string is a number. For a game I am writing I just need to check if a line from the file I am reading is a number or not (I will know if it is a parameter this way). I wrote the below function which I believe was working smoothly (or I accidentally edited to stop it or I'm schizophrenic or Windows is schizophrenic):

bool isParam(string line){
    if(isdigit(atoi(line.c_str()))) return true;
    return false;
}        
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71  
I hate seeing if (expr) return true; return false;! Just write return expr;. –  ephemient Jan 11 '11 at 6:08
6  
@ephemient My style is to do the same as you. But is it really a big deal? –  Brennan Vincent Jan 11 '11 at 6:12
1  
Your function prototype seems not appropriate. Why not use bool isParam(const string& line) –  MikimotoH Jan 11 '11 at 6:34
1  
Yeah. I have a bad habit of coding long-style when learning a new language. I am new to C++ and more hesitant to "shortcuts" (or perceived shortcuts). –  Brendan Weinstein Jan 11 '11 at 6:59
18  
@Brennan Vincent: Yes, it's a big deal. It's the same class of mistakes as if (expr) return expr; else return expr; , if (expr == true) , (if expr != false), or if ((expr == true) == true). They all introduce complexity that does not benefit the writer, reader, or compiler of the code. The elimination of needless complexity is not a shortcut; it's key to writing better software. –  MSalters Jan 11 '11 at 8:24

13 Answers 13

up vote 38 down vote accepted

The most efficient way would be just to iterate over the string until you find a non-digit character. If there are any non-digit characters, you can consider the string not a number.

bool is_number(const std::string& s)
{
    std::string::const_iterator it = s.begin();
    while (it != s.end() && std::isdigit(*it)) ++it;
    return !s.empty() && it == s.end();
}

Or if you want to do it the C++11 way:

bool is_number(const std::string& s)
{
    return !s.empty() && std::find_if(s.begin(), 
        s.end(), [](char c) { return !std::isdigit(c); }) == s.end();
}

As pointed out in the comments below, this only works for positive integers. If you need to detect negative integers or fractions, you should go with a more robust library-based solution. Although, adding support for negative integers is pretty trivial.

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9  
Empty strings are not valid numbers. –  Brennan Vincent Jan 11 '11 at 6:13
1  
Good point, fixed. –  Charles Salvia Jan 11 '11 at 6:14
5  
Also doesn't handle negative numbers and non-whole numbers. We can't know what the requirements are based on the question. –  Brennan Vincent Jan 11 '11 at 6:24
25  
You could also use !s.empty() && s.find_first_not_of("0123456789") == std::string::npos; for a C++03 one-liner. –  kbjorklu Jan 11 '11 at 7:03
3  
Also doesn't handle decimal numbers eg: 1.23 –  user1687981 Mar 10 '13 at 9:31

You can do it the C++ way with boost::lexical_cast. If you really insist on not using boost you can just examine what it does and do that. It's pretty simple.

try 
{
  double x = boost::lexical_cast<double>(str); // double could be anything with >> operator.
}
catch(...) { oops, not a number }
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3  
+1 for the C++ way –  Brennan Vincent Jan 11 '11 at 6:07
7  
Using try{} catch{} a good idea? Should we not avoid it as much as possible? –  Nawaz Jan 11 '11 at 6:17
3  
Nawaz - there's no way to avoid it here. If you'd like to avoid it then you need to rewrite lexical_cast. As it is, lexical_cast is behaving correctly. If the value in the string is not a number then it can't do its job. This IS an exceptional situation for that function. –  Crazy Eddie Jan 11 '11 at 17:19
12  
-1 for abusing try catch... blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2008/09/10/… –  NoSenseEtAl Nov 28 '12 at 9:59
6  
try{} catch{} is appropriate here. However, catch(...) is just bad practice. In this case, use boost::bad_lexical_cast for your exception handler. –  NuSkooler Feb 7 '13 at 17:59

Why reinvent the wheel? The C standard library (available in C++ as well) has a function that does exactly this:

char* p;
long converted = strtol(s, &p, 10);
if (*p) {
    // conversion failed because the input wasn't a number
}
else {
    // use converted
}

If you want to handle fractions or scientific notation, go with strtod instead (you'll get a double result).

If you want to allow hexadecimal and octal constants in C/C++ style ("0xABC"), then make the last parameter 0 instead.

Your function then can be written as

bool isParam(string line)
{
    char* p;
    strtol(line.c_str(), &p, 10);
    return *p == 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This function discards white space in front. You thus have to check first char for isdigit. –  chmike Jun 24 '13 at 8:51
1  
@chmike: Based on my understanding of the question, discarding leading whitespace is the correct behavior (atoi as used in the question does this also). –  Ben Voigt Jun 24 '13 at 12:21
    
The question didn't explicitly specify it, but my understanding of the requirement "checks if a string is a number" means that the whole string is the number, thus no spaces. I felt the need to point out that your answer is different to the others in this regard. Your answer may be fine if it's ok for the string to have spaces in front of the number. –  chmike Jul 1 '13 at 10:53

I just wanted to throw in this idea that uses iteration but some other code does that iteration:

bool is_number(const std::string& s)
{
    return( strspn( s.c_str(), "-.0123456789" ) == s.size() );
}

It's not robust like it should be when checking for a decimal point or minus sign since it allows there to be more than one of each and in any location. The good thing is that it's a single line of code and doesn't require a third-party library.

Take out the '.' and '-' if positive integers are all that are allowed.

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error: 'strspn' was not declared in this scope I think this is because I am missing a "#include" but what one –  Qwertie ϟ Jan 22 at 1:42
    
#include <string.h> –  David Rector Jan 23 at 17:21
2  
If you're going to use std::string, use its find_first_not_of member function. –  Ben Voigt Apr 2 at 16:36
1  
This would fail if you pass in a string of "12.3-4.55-", which is obviously not a valid number –  Buzzrick Aug 15 at 0:22

With this solution you can check everything from negative to positive numbers and even float numbers. When you change the type of num to integer you will get an error if the string contains a point.

#include<iostream>
#include<sstream>
using namespace std;


int main()
{
      string s;

      cin >> s;

      stringstream ss;
      ss << s;

      float num = 0;

      ss >> num;

      if(ss.good()) {
          cerr << "No Valid Number" << endl;
      }
      else if(num == 0 && s[0] != '0') {
          cerr << "No Valid Number" << endl;
      }
      else {
          cout << num<< endl;
      }             
}

Prove: C++ Program

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Here's another way of doing it using the <regex> library:

bool is_integer(const std::string & s){
    return std::regex_match(s, std::regex("[(-|+)|][0-9]+"));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, so it would. I've updated with a better solution. Thanks. –  mpataki14 Mar 20 at 4:00
    
Shouldn't it be "[(-|+)|][0-9]+" (plus instead of star), otherwise your regex could match on "-" or "+" as a valid number. –  David Aug 13 at 18:42
    
Yeah, you're right. Made the change. –  mpataki14 Aug 15 at 13:57

I'd suggest a regex approach. A full regex-match (for example, using boost::regex) with

-?[0-9]+([.][0-9]+)?

would show whether the string is a number or not. This includes positive and negative numbers, integer as well as decimal.

Other variations:

[0-9]+([.][0-9]+)?

(only positive)

-?[0-9]+

(only integer)

[0-9]+

(only positive integer)

share|improve this answer
    
Ahem, I tried to use std::regex with gcc 4.7, gcc 4.8 - they both throw std::regex_error on any sign of [ in regexp, even for an innocent "[abc]" (do I do that wrong?). clang-3.4 is not aware of <regex> at all. Anyway, this seems to be the sanest answer, +1. –  EarlGray Jul 31 '13 at 17:41
1  
@EarlGray: Regex is only available properly from GCC 4.9 –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 1 at 21:28

Here is a solution for checking positive integers:

bool isPositiveInteger(const std::string& s)
{
    return !s.empty() && 
           (std::count_if(s.begin(), s.end(), std::isdigit) == s.size());
}
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With C++11 compiler, for non-negative integers I would use something like this (note the :: instead of std::):

bool is_number(const std::string &s) {
  return !s.empty() && std::all_of(s.begin(), s.end(), ::isdigit);
}

http://ideone.com/OjVJWh

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After consulting the documentation a bit more, I came up with an answer that supports my needs, but probably won't be as helpful for others. Here it is (without the annoying return true and return false statements :-) )

bool isNumber(string line) 
{
    return (atoi(line.c_str())); 
}
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3  
If the number happens to be 0, you'll get a false-negative. –  Charles Salvia Jan 11 '11 at 6:37
2  
This will return any leading number, and not warn you of trailing garbage (e.g. "123hello" ==> 123). @Charles: Brendan mentions he only needs to recognise positive ints in a comment on another answer. –  Tony D Jan 11 '11 at 6:58

Brendan this

bool isNumber(string line) 
{
    return (atoi(line.c_str())); 
}

is almost ok.

assuming any string starting with 0 is a number, Just add a check for this case

bool isNumber(const string &line) 
{
 if (line[0] == '0') return true;
 return (atoi(line.c_str()));
}

ofc "123hello" will return true like Tony D noted.

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A solution based on a comment by kbjorklu is:

bool isNumber(const std::string& s)
{
   return !s.empty() && s.find_first_not_of("-.0123456789") == std::string::npos;
}

As with David Rector's answer it is not robust to strings with multiple dots or minus signs, but you can remove those characters to just check for integers.


However, I am partial to a solution, based on Ben Voigt's solution, using strtod in cstdlib to look decimal values, scientific/engineering notation, hexidecimal notation (C++11), or even INF/INFINITY/NAN (C++11) is:

bool isNumberC(const std::string& s)
{
    char* p;
    strtod(s.c_str(), &p);
    return *p == 0;
}
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Few months ago, I implemented a way to determine if any string is integer, hexadecimal or double.

enum{
        STRING_IS_INVALID_NUMBER=0,
        STRING_IS_HEXA,
        STRING_IS_INT,
        STRING_IS_DOUBLE
};

bool isDigit(char c){
    return (('0' <= c) && (c<='9'));
}

bool isHexaDigit(char c){
    return ((('0' <= c) && (c<='9')) || ((tolower(c)<='a')&&(tolower(c)<='f')));
}


char *ADVANCE_DIGITS(char *aux_p){

    while(CString::isDigit(*aux_p)) aux_p++;
    return aux_p;
}

char *ADVANCE_HEXADIGITS(char *aux_p){

    while(CString::isHexaDigit(*aux_p)) aux_p++;
    return aux_p;
}


int isNumber(const string & test_str_number){
    bool isHexa=false;
    char *str = (char *)test_str_number.c_str();

    switch(*str){
    case '-': str++; // is negative number ...
               break;
    case '0': 
              if(tolower(*str+1)=='x')  {
                  isHexa = true;
                  str+=2;
              }
              break;
    default:
            break;
    };

    char *start_str = str; // saves start position...
    if(isHexa) { // candidate to hexa ...
        str = ADVANCE_HEXADIGITS(str);
        if(str == start_str)
            return STRING_IS_INVALID_NUMBER;

        if(*str == ' ' || *str == 0) 
            return STRING_IS_HEXA;

    }else{ // test if integer or float
        str = ADVANCE_DIGITS(str);
        if(*str=='.') { // is candidate to double
            str++;
            str = ADVANCE_DIGITS(str);
            if(*str == ' ' || *str == 0)
                return STRING_IS_DOUBLE;

            return STRING_IS_INVALID_NUMBER;
        }

        if(*str == ' ' || *str == 0)
            return STRING_IS_INT;

    }

    return STRING_IS_INVALID_NUMBER;


}

Then in your program you can easily convert the number in function its type if you do the following,

string val; // the string to check if number...

switch(isNumber(val)){
   case STRING_IS_HEXA: 
   // use strtol(val.c_str(), NULL, 16); to convert it into conventional hexadecimal
   break;
   case STRING_IS_INT: 
   // use (int)strtol(val.c_str(), NULL, 10); to convert it into conventional integer
   break;
   case STRING_IS_DOUBLE:
   // use atof(val.c_str()); to convert it into conventional float/double
   break;
}

You can realise that the function will return a 0 if the number wasn't detected. The 0 it can be treated as false (like boolean).

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