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  1. I have an object which creates a slideshow.
  2. I want to have several slideshows on a page
  3. I have an event handler for slideshow element inside it
  4. I want the event handler to know which slideshow object has created an item clicked

-

slideshow=function(){

   var g = document.createElement(...);

   ...

   g.onclick = f1;

   f1 = function(slideshow_instance, event) {
      //EXPLAIN ME HOW TO GET THE slideshow_instance
   }

}

var sl1 = new slideshow();
var sl2 = new slideshow();

Clicking on an element slideshow has created should return either

sl1

or

sl2

I explain well?

share|improve this question
    
Where is the slideshow_instance exactly created? –  Epeli Jan 11 '11 at 6:15
    
Have a read of this: stackoverflow.com/questions/4584845/… –  mplungjan Jan 11 '11 at 6:33
    
@Epeli the slideshow_instance is the same as this keyword... But I can't use it inside an event handler –  Dan Jan 11 '11 at 6:55
    
see also stackoverflow.com/questions/337878/js-var-self-this –  Dan Jan 11 '11 at 8:30
    
You should write slideshow variable with capital S so that we can know that it is the constructor. –  Epeli Jan 11 '11 at 16:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Short answer, use: this.

Longer answer, what you want is:

slideshow=function(){
   /* ... */

   var self = this;    

   f1 = function(event) {
      // do stuff with self.
   }

}

The reason you need to point to this using self is that event handlers will change the meaning of this when they are called. But at the time the object is created this properly refer to the correct object (an instance of slideshow). The reason we can access the self variable during event callback is because it has been captured by a closure.

Feel free to google or search on stackoverflow any word/terminology from the above description if you need further explanation.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for being a little cleaner and easier to read than mine :) –  Demian Brecht Jan 11 '11 at 7:18
slideshow=function(){

   var g = document.createElement(...);
   g._objRef = this;

   ...

   g.onclick = f1;

   f1 = function(event) {
      alert(this._objRef);
   }

}

var sl1 = new slideshow();
var sl2 = new slideshow();

A bit of a hack imo, but it should do the trick.

share|improve this answer
    
you both are good! The solution was so simple but I couldn't see it! –  Dan Jan 11 '11 at 7:16
    
You could just use closure here instead of referring it via dom element (which can be even slow). –  Epeli Jan 11 '11 at 17:03

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