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I'v always wondered what they're used for? Seems silly to put them in every time if you can never put anything inside them.

function_name () {
    #statements
}

Also is there anything to gain/lose with putting function at the start of a function?

function function_name () {
    #statements
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The keyword function has been deprecated in favor of function_name() for portability with the POSIX spec

A function is a user-defined name that is used as a simple command to call a compound command with new positional parameters. A function is defined with a "function definition command".

The format of a function definition command is as follows:

fname() compound-command[io-redirect ...]

Note that the { } are not mandatory so if you're not going to use the keyword function (and you shouldn't) then the () are necessary so the parser knows you're defining a function.

Example, this is a legal function definition and invocation:

$ myfunc() for arg; do echo "$arg"; done; myfunc foo bar
foo
bar
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The empty parentheses are required in your first example so that bash knows it's a function definition (otherwise it looks like an ordinary command). In the second example, the () is optional because you've used function.

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Ah ok, guess that makes sense, it's just in PHP you can put stuff inside the parentheses, so I was curious wether I could do something similar in linux scripting. –  Mint Jan 11 '11 at 6:15
2  
@Mint: You can't put anything inside the parentheses and they're not used when calling the function, but you can still pass positional parameters to the function. foo () { echo "$1"; }; foo hello –  Dennis Williamson Jan 11 '11 at 11:53

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