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I have an Entity baseclass which the classes Player and Enemy Inherit.

class Entity
{
  public:

    virtual void Update(sf::RenderWindow &window) {};
    virtual void Draw(sf::RenderWindow &window) {};

};

Both player and enemy contain a sprite object that looks like this:

class Player : Entity
{
   public:

   sf::Sprite sprite

    void Update(sf::RenderWindow &window);
    void Draw(sf::RenderWindow &window)
}

Player and Enemy are created inside a vector which is set up like this:

class EntityManager
{
   public:
   void CollisionCheck();
   private:
   std::vector<Entity*> entityVector;
}

I'm looking to use a collision detection function of this form:

bool Collision::CircleTest(const sf::Sprite& Object1, const sf::Sprite& Object2)

So I'm trying to do something like this:

void EntityManager::ColCheck()
{
   if (Collision::CircleTest(entityVector[0]->sprite, entityVector[1]->sprite))
      {
         cout << "COLLISION\n";
      }
}

This results in the following compile error:

‘class Entity’ has no member named ‘sprite’

I'm unsure how to create a dummy sprite in Entity so that I can access the player and enemy sprites using the above method. Is this possible?

I'm stumped and would greatly appreciate any help anyone can offer!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If everything in your code that derives from Entity has a sprite object, then you should declare that object in the base class.

Not declaring the object in the base class means that there could be a class inheriting from Entity that does not have a sprite object, which means that ColCheck has no valid basis for assuming that elements of entityVector point to something that has a variable called sprite. Make sense?

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Thanks for the reply! If I declare 'Sf::Sprite sprite' inside Entity, then the code will compile, however it doesn't seem to affect the sprite of the object in the vector i'm trying to access. So something like 'entityVector[0]->sprite.move(1.0)' doesn't actually seem to affect that sprite at all. –  Te1 Jan 11 '11 at 6:16
    
This could be a completely separate issue. No way to tell without seeing the code for move. I would recommend trying to get as simple a test case as possible and posting a new question. –  Brennan Vincent Jan 11 '11 at 6:20
    
It worked, the problem was I declared sf::Sprite sprite inside both Entity and Player. Once I removed it from Player everything stopped complaining. Cheers! –  Te1 Jan 11 '11 at 6:45

You could make a member function sprite() that is declared as a pure virtual function inside Entity:

class Entity {
public:
    virtual void Update(sf::RenderWindow &window) {};
    virtual void Draw(sf::RenderWindow &window) {};

    virtual sf::Sprite& sprite() = 0;
};

Then, the Player and Enemy implementations would return the sf::Sprite instance variables each has. However, the other posters bring up a valid point; it might make sense to have the sprite be in the base class if all derived classes are going to have one.

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If both Player and Enemy classes contain sprite, why not declare it inside Entity? This should solve your problem.

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You probably shouldn't create a dummy unless having a sprite is something ALL entities have.

What you might want is to use a visitor pattern or possibly one of the many multiple-dispatch implementations. Which and what will end up having to be up to you.

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Hi, thanks for the answer! Sprite is something that all entities have and will have in this case. What method would I use to create a dummy sprite? –  Te1 Jan 11 '11 at 6:11

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