Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm brand new to linq. I'm sure that I'm missing something due to inexperience.

the problem: I am using linq to query objects and return enumerable Acct objects where o.Diff!=0

if I try to enumerate the results I get the error unable to cast object of type System.Collections.Generic.KeyValuePair '2[Acct]' to type 'Acct'.

the question: how can i return enumerable Acct objects from the Linq query?

Thanks in advance!

public class AcctSum
{
  string ID;
  Decimal Amt1;
  Decimal Amt2;
  Decimal Diff;
  ArrayList<AcctDet> lines;
}

public class AcctInfo
{
  Dictionary<string,AcctSum> acct

  //code that adds the data...
  public iEnumerable Discrepancies()
  {
    var results = (from Acct a in acct
                   where a.Diff != 0
                   select a).AsEnumerable<Acct>();
    foreach (var result in results)//at runtime this generates an error

    {
    }                                    
    return results.GetEnumerator();
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
You're interchangingly using Acct and AcctSum. That's doesn't seem right. You can't convert from one to another if Acct is an enum. –  Schultz9999 Jan 11 '11 at 6:16
    
First change the Acct in from to a variable name not type name, like variable1, then change AsEnumerable<Acct>() to AsEnumerable<AcctSum>(), and last change the in acct to in acct.Values –  Jani Jan 11 '11 at 6:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As others have said, it sounds like you want to be iterating over the values, not the key/value pairs.

That means you could use a query like this:

var results = from acctSum value in acct.Values
              where acctSum.Diff != 0
              select acctSum;

but personally I wouldn't bother using a query expression in this case. I'd just use the extension methods:

var results = acct.Values.Where(acctSum => acctSum.Diff != 0);

Now, in terms of the return type, I strongly suspect you want to return IEnumerable<AcctSum> rather than IEnumerator or IEnumerator<T>. So you might want:

public IEnumerable<AcctSum> Discrepancies()
{
    return acct.Values.Where(acctSum => acctSum.Diff != 0);
}

or you might want to "materialize" the query - get all the results in one go, and return those (rather than returning a query which can be iterated over lazily). For example:

public IEnumerable<AcctSum> Discrepancies()
{
    return acct.Values.Where(acctSum => acctSum.Diff != 0).ToList();
}

In particular, by materializing the query you're allowing callers to modify acct while they're iterating over these results - if they try to do so while they're iterating over the raw query, they'll get an exception.

You'll also need to change your AcctSum class, because ArrayList isn't a generic type in .NET. Did you mean to use List<T>?

share|improve this answer
    
I will switch the ArrayList to List, I saw it in another sample. I'm trying this out now, thanks! –  kes Jan 11 '11 at 13:20
    
the last example, .ToList(), was exactly what I was looking for; The whole thing still feels like a magic trick though. I guess it's time to take of the blinders and learn the new paradigm :) –  kes Jan 11 '11 at 14:18

The problem is that as you iterate over your dictionary, you are casting each item as an Acct, when in fact, each of the items in your Dictionary is a KeyValuePair. Try something like:

from KeyValuePair<string,AcctSum> acctKVP in acct // assuming acct is of type Dictionary<string,AcctSum>
where acctKvp.Value.Diff != 0
share|improve this answer

When you iterate over acct, each item is a key/value pair from the dictionary. Assuming the Acct object is the value in each pair, you would get all of the nonzero accounts like this:

from a in acct.Values
where a.Diff != 0
select a
share|improve this answer

Well, it's b/c acct is a dictionary (which is an IEnumerable<KeyValuePair>, iirc, under the hood. Change your source from acct to acct.Values

share|improve this answer

First, the return type should be IEnumerator, not IEnumerable. Secondly, acct contains a collection of key value pairs, so you have to run the query on the key value (in this case)

void Main()
{
    var acctInfo = new AcctInfo();
    acctInfo.Discrepancies();

}
public class AcctSum
{

    string ID;
    Decimal Amt1;
    Decimal Amt2;
    public Decimal Diff;
    ArrayList lines;
}

public class AcctInfo
{
    public IEnumerator Discrepancies()
    {
        var acct = new Dictionary<int, AcctSum>
                       {{1, new AcctSum() {Diff = 0.0M}}, {2, new AcctSum() {Diff = 1.0M}}};

        var results = (from AcctSum a in acct.Values where a.Diff != 0 select a).AsEnumerable();

        foreach (var result in results)//at runtime this generates an error
        {

        }
        return results.GetEnumerator();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I would return IEnumerable<T> instead of IEnumerator. It's pretty rare to return an iterator from anything other than a GetEnumerator method implementing IEnumerable or IEnumerable<T>. –  Jon Skeet Jan 11 '11 at 6:26
    
As would I, but as he was returning the GetEnumerator(), I figured it was deliberate. Either way, something had to change :) –  Rob Jan 11 '11 at 6:29
    
yup, i messed up. i was trying to implement so that I could do foreach and/or return it for datagrid binding. and yes, for binding i needed to adjust the variables to properties :) –  kes Jan 11 '11 at 21:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.