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I have a view that's something like

CREATE VIEW OrdersView WITH SCHEMABINDING AS
SELECT o.Id, o.OrderDate, o.LastName, o.TotalPrice, s.Status
FROM dbo.Orders o INNER JOIN dbo.OrderStatus s on o.Id = s.OrderId
WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT NULL from dbo.OrderStatus where OrderId = s.OrderId and StatusDate > s.StatusDate
AND EXISTS (SELECT NULL FROM dbo.OrderLineItemType1 WHERE OrderId = o.Id)

The intent is to fetch all orders that have at least one line item of type 1 along with their current status.

We're in the process of adding a second type of line item, and I have modified the view such that it will include orders that have at least one line item of type 1 or type 2:

CREATE VIEW OrdersView WITH SCHEMABINDING AS
SELECT o.Id, o.OrderDate, o.LastName, o.TotalPrice, s.Status
FROM dbo.Orders o INNER JOIN dbo.OrderStatus s on o.Id = s.OrderId
WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT NULL from dbo.OrderStatus where OrderId = s.OrderId and StatusDate > s.StatusDate
AND (EXISTS (SELECT NULL FROM dbo.OrderLineItemType1 WHERE OrderId = o.Id)
  OR EXISTS (SELECT NULL FROM dbo.OrderLineItemType2 WHERE OrderId = o.Id))

Easy enough, but I've just had a requirement added to show whether an order contains line items of type 1 or type 2 (or both) in the grid where these results are displayed:

Order ID | T1 | T2 | Last name | Price    | Status
============================================================
12345    | x  |    | Smith     | $100.00  | In Production
12346    | x  | x  | Jones     | $147.23  | Part Dispatched
12347    |    | x  | Atwood    | $12.50   | Dispatched

The only way I can think of is to do:

CREATE VIEW OrdersView WITH SCHEMABINDING AS
SELECT o.Id, 
       CASE WHEN EXISTS (SELECT NULL FROM dbo.OrderLineItemType1 WHERE OrderID = o.Id) THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS HasType1,
       CASE WHEN EXISTS (SELECT NULL FROM dbo.OrderLineItemType2 WHERE OrderId = o.ID) THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS HasType2,
       o.OrderDate, o.LastName, o.TotalPrice, s.Status
FROM dbo.Orders o INNER JOIN dbo.OrderStatus s on o.Id = s.OrderId
WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT NULL from dbo.OrderStatus where OrderId = s.OrderId and StatusDate > s.StatusDate
AND (EXISTS (SELECT NULL FROM dbo.OrderLineItemType1 WHERE OrderId = o.Id)
  OR EXISTS (SELECT NULL FROM dbo.OrderLineItemType2 WHERE OrderId = o.Id))

But this smells wrong with the duplication of the EXISTS clauses. Is there a better qway to write it? Can I make it perform better?

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1  
SELECT NULL? I haven't seen code using a construct like that for quite some time - they fixed the optimizer so that SELECT * in EXISTS clauses is as efficient (if not more so) than alternate constructs back in, I think, SQL Server 2000 (if not earlier) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 11 '11 at 9:25
    
@Damien I didn't write the original view :P –  Jon Jan 11 '11 at 9:26
    
If you examine the execution plan - how many scans/seeks against the OrderLineItemTypeX tables are there? If there's only one, then the optimizer has been smart enough to spot that it only needs it once, and we're unlikely to improve the performance (but there may be better ways to write it, still thinking on that) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 11 '11 at 9:34
5  
For me, the code smell of choice is having distinct tables named OrderLineItemType1 and OrderLineItemType2. –  onedaywhen Jan 11 '11 at 9:34
3  
@onedaywhen Firstly, they're not really called that, they're named more closely after the actual entities they represent (just trying to keep it general and also avoid disclosing confidential stuff). Also, the entities have vastly different properties that aren't really related. The only thing they have in common is that they both represent order line items... –  Jon Jan 11 '11 at 10:34

3 Answers 3

you can LEFT JOIN on OrderLineItemType1 and OrderLineItemType2 and then filter out rows where both of those columns are NULL in the WHERE clause.

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He'd also have to introduce a GROUP BY, and some aggregates in his SELECT clause, since there can (by his description) be more than one of these line items for a particular order. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 11 '11 at 9:31
    
good call, glossed over that part –  leeny Jan 11 '11 at 9:54
    
Agree on LEFT JOINs, only not the tables themselves but the derived lists like SELECT DISTINCT OrderId FROM .... –  Andriy M Jan 11 '11 at 14:35

One change that may be worth profiling (but not directly related to your specific question).

The following two lines:

FROM dbo.Orders o INNER JOIN dbo.OrderStatus s on o.Id = s.OrderId
WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT NULL from dbo.OrderStatus where OrderId = s.OrderId and StatusDate > s.StatusDate

It may be better to write this as:

FROM dbo.Orders o INNER JOIN dbo.OrderStatus s on o.Id = s.OrderId
        LEFT JOIN dbo.OrderStatus s_later on o.Id  = s_later.OrderId and s_later.StatusDate > s.StatusDate
WHERE s_later.OrderId is null

I usually find that this performs better (but it's one of those that it's worth profiling both ways).

The LEFT JOIN tries to find later rows that apply to the same order, then the WHERE clause rejects any potential result rows where such a match occurred - so the only matching row from s must be the latest one for this order.

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The construct essentially selects only records that a referred by OrderStatus with the earliest values of StatusDate, or am I wrong? Personally, I would rather INNER JOINed with SELECT OrderId, MIN(StatusDate) FROM OrderStatus GROUP BY OrderId on both columns instead of the proposed LEFT JOIN + WHERE option. Seems more optimisation-prone. –  Andriy M Jan 11 '11 at 14:35
    
@Andriy M - It's actually finding the last row in OrderStatus for this particular order - and they're using more than just the date information from this row (s.Status is the last column of the select) - so you can't just do MAX(StatusDate) for each OrderID. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 11 '11 at 15:00
    
You are right, and I didn't mean to eliminate the INNER JOIN OrderStatus part. The INNER JOIN (derived table) only replaces the NOT EXISTS () condition in the original script (and the LEFT JOIN + WHERE condition in yours). It is actually joined on OrderId and MIN(StatusDate) values the latter of which can only be compared to s.StatusDate. –  Andriy M Jan 11 '11 at 15:06
    
And you are right on the other point, of course it's the latest entry that is selected. My bad. –  Andriy M Jan 11 '11 at 15:17

You don't need EXISTS here at all:

SELECT  o.Id, HasType1, HasType2, o.OrderDate, o.LastName, o.TotalPrice, s.Status
FROM    dbo.Orders o
CROSS APPLY
        (
        SELECT  TOP 1 s.*
        FROM    dbo.OrderStatus
        WHERE   OrderId = o.Id
        ORDER BY
                StatusDate DESC
        ) s
OUTER APPLY
        (
        SELECT  TOP 1 1 AS HasType1
        FROM    dbo.OrderLineItemType1
        WHERE   OrderID = o.Id
        ) olt1
OUTER APPLY
        (
        SELECT  TOP 1 1 AS HasType2
        FROM    dbo.OrderLineItemType2
        WHERE   OrderID = o.Id
        ) olt2
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